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Friday, September 20, 2019

5 Types of Container Weighing Systems for Ports and Terminals

Posted to Kevin Hill's Blog (by Kevin HIll) on July 17, 2017

Every port and terminal facility needs weighing systems for containers. Weighing is critical in several processes in ports where accurate readings are paramount. To achieve this, the following weighing solutions can be incorporated. 1. WeighbridgesWeighbridges…

Battle of Actium

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 23, 2015

After the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C., the Roman Republic was led by the Second Triumvirate, which consisted of Octavian (the adopted son of Julius Caesar), Mark Antony (the magister equitum of Caesar’s army), and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus (a political ally of Julius Caesar).

U.S. Coast Guard: Cherry-Picking is Not an Option

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on September 1, 2010

Responding directly to our August 10th article entitled, “STCW Compliance: will we or won’t we,” the U.S. Coast Guard’s Director of National and International Standards has affirmed the U.S. position on STCW compliance, especially as it relates…

FUSI to agitate for seamen’s wage revision

Posted to FUSI to agitate for seamen’s wage revision (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 19, 2010

With negotiations on their charter of demands in a deadlock the Forward Seamen’s Union of India (FSUI) which claims having majority representation of seamen among the two seafarers’ unions has threatened to agitate or even strike work. A charter of demands had been submitted for 2010 – 2012.

New Siberian Islands

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 6, 2015

The archipelago called the New Siberian Islands is not new, having existed for eons and containing fossils from the Late Pleistocene (over 100,000 years ago) and probably earlier. Bedrock on the islands is significantly older. The archipelago is comprised of three groups of islands.

IN WATER HULL CLEANING IN VIETNAM

Posted to DIVING & IN WATER WORKS (by AIM Surveyors) on July 1, 2013

AIM Control  is an independent Vietnam based company specializing in providing underwater diving and maintenance service to the shipping industry in Vietnam and the neighbouring countries with associations strategically located in all the…

Size counts on weak Asia-Europe routes

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on June 19, 2013

The mega vessel sharing agreement between the world’s three biggest container lines is going to completely dominate Asia-Europe trade with ships from Maersk, MSC and CMA CGM having a good 40 percent share of the market. The P3 Network, as it is called…

Picton Castle

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 3, 2013

The barque Picton Castle is a commercial sail training vessel homeported in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia and registered in the Cook Islands. It was built in Swansea, Wales in 1928 as a motorized fishing trawler and named for the local Welsh castle.

Market expectations from DNV and GL merger

Posted to Market expectations from DNV and GL merger (by Joseph Fonseca) on January 23, 2013

The recent announcement of the merger of the two classification societies Germanischer Lloyd (GL) and Det Norske Veritas (DNV) seems to have caused an unsettling effect on shipping companies, classification societiesand others related organizations.

MLC set to brighten up the seafaring career

Posted to MLC set to brighten up the seafaring career (by Joseph Fonseca) on October 29, 2012

Set to bring back the lost glory of seafaring, the Maritime Labor Convention 2006 (MLC) which will come into force on 20 August 2013, is expected to not only provide  comprehensive rights and protection at work for the seafarers but is also…

China looks inwards as export demand remains weak

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on October 25, 2012

China became known as the world’s factory by offering manufacturing costs that could not be matched by the developed nations. Its wages paid to uneducated rural migrant labour were a fraction of the mostly unionized pay required in the West, and land for factories was plentiful and cheap.

Preventing Accidents due to Human Errors thru Ergonomic design

Posted to Preventing Accidents due to Human Errors thru Ergonomic design (by Joseph Fonseca) on August 13, 2012

Regulations and systems have not achieved the desired effects in averting marine accidents which are a result of human errors and account for 80 per cent of those occurring worldwide. The implementation of the International Safety Management…

Great White Fleet

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 30, 2012

Starting in about 1890, the United States Navy began a rebuilding program to replace its antiquated fleet, most of which then dated from the Civil War. It handily won the naval conflicts of the Spanish-American War, but that was against a nation with an even more antiquated fleet.

Some TWICs Won’t Work in Readers

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on December 6, 2011

Some 26,000 Transportation Worker Identification Credentials (TWICs) may be rejected by TWIC reader machines because of defective encoding. At some point recently, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) posted on the “Latest News”…

Henry Morgan

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 19, 2011

Henry Morgan (1635-1688) was born in Wales and died in Jamaica. Between those two dates, he lived a notorious and audacious life. At age twenty, he sailed to Barbados where he served as an apprentice to a cutler. Three years later, he showed up in Jamaica as a soldier of fortune.

Spratly war a bad idea, especially for Vietnam

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on June 16, 2011

In this case, a string of islands. The remote, rocky and barely habitable Spratly Islands in the South China Sea. Less than two square miles of islands scattered over 165,000 square miles of ocean. WTF, as my kids say. The Spratlys are claimed by China…

One Small Step for the TWIC Program?

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on September 30, 2010

Last week the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) updated its list of TWIC Readers that have successfully completed the Initial Capability Evaluation (ICE) to include an additional hand-held reader. This brings the total of portable…