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Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Sea lily

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 13, 2015

The sea lily (Bourgueticrinida) is an order of marine animals referred to as crinoids. They are typically found in deep ocean waters (to a depth of about 18,000 feet). In their adult form, they are attached to the sea floor by means of a stalk.

Zeroing in on Zukunft:

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on February 3, 2015

Long Beach, CA: Less than 12 hours after the New England Patriots’ late game heroics stunned the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XLIX, U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Paul Zukunft found himself facing a standing room only audience of Passenger Vessel Association (PVA) delegates…

Anglo Eastern innovate Advance Process Instrumentation Trainer

Posted to Anglo Eastern innovate Advance Process Instrumentation Trainer (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 4, 2011

Since simulators, ship-in-campus and other systems have their limitation for imparting training to marine engineers in some of the advanced areas Anglo Eastern Maritime Training Center has come up with an innovation for imparting training to…

Results of the April 12-13 Meeting of NMSAC - Part 1

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on April 15, 2011

The US Government having been kept in business for another week, the National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC) started a two-day meeting on April 12th. The agenda previously discussed was modified such that the day started with the discussion of Seafarer Access Shore Leave Policy…

Sea otter

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 31, 2014

The sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a member of the weasel family that ran away to sea. It is the smallest of the marine mammals and the only one that does not rely on fat (blubber) for warmth. Rather, it has the thickest coat of fur of any mammal – up to one million strands of hair per square inch.

Malacca

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 8, 2014

The Strait of Malacca is named after Malacca, now part of Malaysia. In about the year 1400, Parameswana, the last Raja of Singapura, was expelled from the area around present-day Singapore by local rivals. He relocated to the fishing village of Malacca…

Elephant seal

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 1, 2014

Elephant seals are large seals represented by two species, the northern elephant seal and the southern elephant seal. Both were hunted to near extinction through the end of the nineteenth century. The smaller northern elephant seal is found in the eastern portion of the North Pacific Ocean…

SCI acquires Kamsarmax Bulk carrier & PSV

Posted to SCI acquires Kamsarmax Bulk carrier & PSV (by Joseph Fonseca) on December 19, 2012

The Shipping Corporation of India Ltd. (SCI) accepted delivery of a Kamsarmax Bulk carrier, m.v. “Vishva Jyoti” yesterday. The vessel is the first of a series of four Kamsarmax bulk carriers ordered by SCI with Jiangsu Eastern Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., China.

SINKEX

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 31, 2012

The United States Navy disposes of many of its old, obsolete, and decommissioned warships by sinking them in deep ocean waters. This practice, called a sinking exercise or SINKEX, involves removing toxic and hazardous substances to the maximum practicable extent…

What have we learned from the Titanic casualty?

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 13, 2012

Late on the night of April 14, 1912, the “unsinkable” passenger ship RMS Titanic, on its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York struck an iceberg. It sank about three hours later, at about 2:20 a.m. on April 15, 1912. Of the 2,224 persons on board, 1,514 lost their lives.

Abel Tasman

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 4, 2012

Abel Tasman (1603-1659) was a Dutch merchant and explorer. He is credited with the European discovery of Australia and New Zealand. He joined the Dutch United East India Company (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie - VOC) in 1633 and was promptly…

Carriers warn Vale's big bulkers will dampen rates

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on December 9, 2010

The dry bulk shipping business is going through a tough time. It is an incredible 80 percent down on the market peak in May 2008, and rates have led carrier operators on a wild and volatile ride ever since. The industry is currently oversupplied with bulk carriers…

Vizhinjam to become major transshipment port in S. India

Posted to Vizhinjam to become major transshipment port in S. India (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 29, 2010

Vizhinjam, a port located near the Southern tip of India and close to the international shipping route is being developed into a major transshipment port. Once completed it is expected to attract annually over 10,000 ships that is half the number that pass through the Suez Canal.