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Tuesday, October 20, 2020

The trans-Pacific group sets teeth on edge again

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on August 30, 2012

Hackles are rising over the 15-member “discussion” group, the Transpacific Stabilization Agreement, and its “discussion” that has led to an “adjustment” (when any authority speaks of an “adjustment”, you can be darn sure the price is going up) of the bunker charge of $17 per FEU to the West Coast…

U.S. Coast Guard: Cherry-Picking is Not an Option

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on September 1, 2010

Responding directly to our August 10th article entitled, “STCW Compliance: will we or won’t we,” the U.S. Coast Guard’s Director of National and International Standards has affirmed the U.S. position on STCW compliance, especially as it relates…

Yangtze shipping left high and dry

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on January 25, 2012

The Year of the Dragon begins now, represented in the Chinese zodiac by the Water Dragon. There is some irony in that, because the worst drought in 50 years has forced Chinese maritime authorities to close the Yangtze River above the port of Wuhan, more than 600 miles upriver from Shanghai.

Proposed USCG STCW Regulations Impact Maritime Security

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on September 29, 2011

Proposed US Coast Guard regulations to implement the STCW Convention will, if adopted, have both direct and indirect impacts on maritime transportation security programs. That said, implementation of the maritime-security-specific STCW amendments…

Limitation of Liability Act of 1851

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 6, 2010

The Limitation of Liability Act, now located at 46 U.S. Code sections 30501-30512, was adopted to provide shipowners a measure of protection if their ships were to cause injury or damage to others in cases where the shipowners have no privity or knowledge relative to the cause of the incident.