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Thursday, July 18, 2019

Prison Ship Martyrs’ Monument

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 3, 2013

During the American Revolutionary War, British forces captured thousands of “rebels”. Those in uniform were accorded treatment somewhat akin to prisoner of war status. Those not in uniform, particularly the maritime privateers, were subjected to harsher conditions.

Civil engineers update their report card on ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on March 31, 2013

In what is essentially an update of a 2012 report, The American Society of Civil Engineers has awarded a C grade to the nation’s seaports and their efforts to keep up with essential maintenance and improvement. Much of the report I covered in…

Proposed USCG STCW Regulations Impact Maritime Security

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on September 29, 2011

Proposed US Coast Guard regulations to implement the STCW Convention will, if adopted, have both direct and indirect impacts on maritime transportation security programs. That said, implementation of the maritime-security-specific STCW amendments…

Anglo Eastern innovate Advance Process Instrumentation Trainer

Posted to Anglo Eastern innovate Advance Process Instrumentation Trainer (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 4, 2011

Since simulators, ship-in-campus and other systems have their limitation for imparting training to marine engineers in some of the advanced areas Anglo Eastern Maritime Training Center has come up with an innovation for imparting training to…

The trans-Pacific group sets teeth on edge again

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on August 30, 2012

Hackles are rising over the 15-member “discussion” group, the Transpacific Stabilization Agreement, and its “discussion” that has led to an “adjustment” (when any authority speaks of an “adjustment”, you can be darn sure the price is going up) of the bunker charge of $17 per FEU to the West Coast…

South China terminals face capacity overhang as demand falters

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on March 15, 2012

South China’s annual throughput was close to 60 million TEUs last year. There is no cluster of ports in the world that can boast that kind of volume, which enabled the province of Guangdong to claim a third of China exports. The rise of manufacturing…

Yangtze shipping left high and dry

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on January 25, 2012

The Year of the Dragon begins now, represented in the Chinese zodiac by the Water Dragon. There is some irony in that, because the worst drought in 50 years has forced Chinese maritime authorities to close the Yangtze River above the port of Wuhan, more than 600 miles upriver from Shanghai.

Marad’s Crown Jewel: v2 – a work in progress…

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on December 14, 2011

You have to ask yourself – what’s the hurry? The urgency with which the U.S. Department of Transportation and its usually ineffective Maritime Administration seem to be intent on reinventing the wheel on the campus of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy is simply breathtaking.

Perihelion

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 4, 2011

The whoosh you experienced at about 1900 UTC on Monday, January 3, 2011 was the sun passing by on its closest approach to the Earth – a mere 91,402,505 miles away. This recurs every year, often at night when it can’t be observed. The date and…

Nikumaroro

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 21, 2010

Nikumaroro (previously known as Gardner Island) is a small coral atoll in the central Pacific Ocean situated just south of the Equator and just west of the 180th meridian. It lies in the Phoenix Island Chain and is part of the Republic of Kiribati.

U.S. Coast Guard: Cherry-Picking is Not an Option

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on September 1, 2010

Responding directly to our August 10th article entitled, “STCW Compliance: will we or won’t we,” the U.S. Coast Guard’s Director of National and International Standards has affirmed the U.S. position on STCW compliance, especially as it relates…

Unique Corus Tubes for Tupi Project

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on July 9, 2010

Corus Tubes has successfully manufactured 118km of 457mm x 31.75mm Grade X65 sour linepipe for the Petrobras Tupi project. This linepipe is designed to operate in Brazil’s Santos Basin at a depth of 2200m, and is thickest 18” UOE pipe manufactured to date.

Limitation of Liability Act of 1851

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 6, 2010

The Limitation of Liability Act, now located at 46 U.S. Code sections 30501-30512, was adopted to provide shipowners a measure of protection if their ships were to cause injury or damage to others in cases where the shipowners have no privity or knowledge relative to the cause of the incident.

The LA Shipyard Wrangle is About to Hit the Bumpers

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on May 27, 2010

A costly, unsatisfactory compromise is likely in the unsettling wrangle over the largely defunct Southwest Marine shipyard, now owned by Gambol Industries, in Los Angeles. The year's deadline is but a month away for a plan to be produced over…