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Thursday, July 18, 2019

What have we learned from the Titanic casualty?

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 13, 2012

Late on the night of April 14, 1912, the “unsinkable” passenger ship RMS Titanic, on its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York struck an iceberg. It sank about three hours later, at about 2:20 a.m. on April 15, 1912. Of the 2,224 persons on board, 1,514 lost their lives.

Understanding eLearning in Maritime Job Training and Familiarization - Part 4

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on February 6, 2012

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Share this blog post.Follow me on Twitter.Understanding eLearning…

Cross-currents show up in the Harbor Maintenance Tax uproar

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 29, 2011

That proposal to apply the Harbor Maintenance Tax to imports taking the long way round through Canada and Mexico is stirring up considerable debate that exposes sharply different viewpoints. So much so that the Shipping Federation of Canada…

Pensacola

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 9, 2011

Pensacola is the westernmost city in Florida, nearly extending into Alabama. It is the homeport for a number of fishing vessels and small passenger vessels. One of its claims to fame is that it is the site of the first European settlement in…

Seven Seas Navigation to conduct training in India for Panama Registry

Posted to Seven Seas Navigation to conduct training in India for Panama Registry (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 21, 2011

Seven Seas Navigation India Pvt Ltd., Mumbai has been authorized by the Seafarers Training Center in Panama to conduct Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW) courses authorized by the Maritime Authority of Panama. These…

Nikumaroro

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 21, 2010

Nikumaroro (previously known as Gardner Island) is a small coral atoll in the central Pacific Ocean situated just south of the Equator and just west of the 180th meridian. It lies in the Phoenix Island Chain and is part of the Republic of Kiribati.

Back from the (almost) dead

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 5, 2010

The requirement for scanning of 100% of maritime shipping containers in overseas ports prior to loading on a ship bound for the United States was enacted into federal law (with various caveats) by the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007.

One Small Step for the TWIC Program?

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on September 30, 2010

Last week the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) updated its list of TWIC Readers that have successfully completed the Initial Capability Evaluation (ICE) to include an additional hand-held reader. This brings the total of portable…

Turkish Straits

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 20, 2010

The Turkish Straits consist of two narrow straits in northwestern Turkey, the Bosporus and the Dardanelles, and the Sea of Marmara that connects them. The Turkish Straits lie between the Black Sea to the east and the Aegean Sea, which is a region of the much larger Mediterranean Sea.

Grand Cayman sea level data

Posted to Gulf Coast hurricane intensity reduction (by Richard LaRosa) on January 26, 2010

MSL monthly averages for Grand Cayman and Settlement Point are available from Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory for 1986 through 1996. Settlement Point is still operating but the data has not been supplied to Proudman's Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level. I don't know how to access the data.

Tardy Hong Kong missing the cruise boat

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on October 13, 2009

It took the Hong Kong government 10 years after the airport moved to call for tenders to develop the old Kai Tak airport site and slap a cruise terminal at one end. And it has taken another two years on top of that for the first foot to finally step on the first shovel to begin preparation work.