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Sunday, December 8, 2019

Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy in Turkey

Posted to Global Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy (by Vietnam Inspection Company) on July 30, 2014

Turkey Inspection in Turkey/ Expediting/ Surveillance/ Inspector/Expediter/  Quality control/ Testing/ Certificate/ Marine Surveyors/Superintendent P&I Correspondents Insured cargo, marine investigation & adjusting in Turkey, Countries. Dr Capt.

Taiping Island

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 24, 2014

The Spratly Islands are a group of islets, cays, atolls, and coral reefs located in the southern portion of the South China Sea. Taiping Island (also called Itu Aba Island) is the largest of these islets and the only one with fresh water springs.

Teak

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 20, 2014

Teak is the common name for the Tectona grandis, a member of the verbena family native to the hardwood forests of India, Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia. It is a large deciduous tree, growing to a height of 130 feet, with gray and grayish brown branches.

Bibby Maritime upscale training in India

Posted to Bibby Maritime upscale training in India (by Joseph Fonseca) on February 3, 2014

Despite the recessionary phase in shipping, training institutes in India known for their unflinching dedication to quality education have done better than most establishments in other sectors of the maritime trade. Even recent entrant such as Sir Derek Bibby Maritime Training Center…

Chowgule’s ship-lift fast becoming a reality

Posted to Chowgule’s ship-lift fast becoming a reality (by Joseph Fonseca) on January 8, 2014

Mid-way between Mumbai and Goa on the West coast of India, a new ship-lift facility being constructed by the Chowgule group, is fast becoming a reality. Situated adjacent to the group’s Angre Port, the repair yard will have the capacity to handle six ships simultaneously of up to 10…

Fluyt

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 5, 2013

The fluyt or fluitschip was one of the first ocean-going ships built exclusively for commerce. Previously, ships tended to be built to perform the dual role of fighting battles and carrying cargo. Thus, their construction was fairly robust and they carried cannons, ammunition, and combat personnel.

Fort Zeelandia

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 1, 2013

Once the Dutch decided to compete with the Portuguese and the Spanish for maritime commerce with East Asia, they jumped in with both feet. After establishing a base in Batavia (modern-day Jakarta), they focused on trade with China and Japan.

Long Beach ties itself in knots

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on October 29, 2013

Two issues are needlessly consuming Long Beach’s board of harbor commissioners. A new head office and executive director search are pushing other more important matters out of the way. The head office squabble is taking on ludicrous proportions.

It’s hunky dory on maritime manning & training front

Posted to It’s hunky dory on maritime manning & training front (by Joseph Fonseca) on February 11, 2013

Encouraging updates from the Manning and Training sector in India present a healthy picture of the industry. It appears that the future is set to get brighter as was revealed in a panel discussion held under the aegis of the Company of Master Mariners of India.

S.A. Agulhas II

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 18, 2013

The Agulhas II replaces the older and smaller Agulhas as South Africa’s supply vessel for its scientific and weather stations in Antarctica (SANAE IV located on a rocky outcrop several miles inland in the Queen Maud region); on Marion Island…

What have we learned from the Titanic casualty?

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 13, 2012

Late on the night of April 14, 1912, the “unsinkable” passenger ship RMS Titanic, on its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York struck an iceberg. It sank about three hours later, at about 2:20 a.m. on April 15, 1912. Of the 2,224 persons on board, 1,514 lost their lives.

Louisiana is Shipyard Leader in USA

Posted to Ship Building in the US Gulf Coast Region (by Tyler LeCompte) on January 19, 2012

Leevac’s shipyard in Louisiana and new vessel construction facilities include an 85,000-square-foot computerized steel fabrication shop (with a computer-aided plasma cutting machine), a computerized pipe machine (three-axis pipe cutting system)…

Cross-currents show up in the Harbor Maintenance Tax uproar

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 29, 2011

That proposal to apply the Harbor Maintenance Tax to imports taking the long way round through Canada and Mexico is stirring up considerable debate that exposes sharply different viewpoints. So much so that the Shipping Federation of Canada…

Pensacola

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 9, 2011

Pensacola is the westernmost city in Florida, nearly extending into Alabama. It is the homeport for a number of fishing vessels and small passenger vessels. One of its claims to fame is that it is the site of the first European settlement in…

Seven Seas Navigation to conduct training in India for Panama Registry

Posted to Seven Seas Navigation to conduct training in India for Panama Registry (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 21, 2011

Seven Seas Navigation India Pvt Ltd., Mumbai has been authorized by the Seafarers Training Center in Panama to conduct Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW) courses authorized by the Maritime Authority of Panama. These…

Proposed USCG STCW Regulations Impact Maritime Security

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on September 29, 2011

Proposed US Coast Guard regulations to implement the STCW Convention will, if adopted, have both direct and indirect impacts on maritime transportation security programs. That said, implementation of the maritime-security-specific STCW amendments…

Not much to look forward to this year for oversupplied carriers

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on April 29, 2011

The first quarter results have been coming in over the last month and they are a mixed bag of good, bad and ugly. Good would be China’s Cosco Shipping, a subsidiary of the country’s largest shipping firm China Ocean Shipping (Group) Co, which announced a 150 percent increase in net profit.

A Temporary Change in Latitude – and Attitude

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on April 20, 2011

Bonaire, Netherland Antilles: Day four of spring break finds me on the verandah of my laid back Bonaire resort, looking out over the pristine maritime landscape. This week, we returned here for holiday, three years after first discovering this island jewel back in April of 2008.

Rotterdam and Mumbai agree for mutual cooperation

Posted to Rotterdam and Mumbai agree to mutually cooperate (by Joseph Fonseca) on February 16, 2011

Yet another port has been positioned to serve as the European gateway for shipments to and from Mumbai. This time on 10 February the representatives of the city port of Rotterdam visited Mumbai and met those of the city port of Mumbai and resolved…

Carriers warn Vale's big bulkers will dampen rates

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on December 9, 2010

The dry bulk shipping business is going through a tough time. It is an incredible 80 percent down on the market peak in May 2008, and rates have led carrier operators on a wild and volatile ride ever since. The industry is currently oversupplied with bulk carriers…
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