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Sunday, December 15, 2019

Maritime Logistics Professional

DNV’s Quantum Container Ship

Posted to Marine Propulsion Report (by on April 16, 2010

In the April DNV Container Ship Update publication, the new Quantum container ship survey and design brings many subjects together in one report. Although a concept ship, it is a practical design that could be ordered today but equally well, be ordered, unchanged five or ten years hence. The survey of ship owners gives a wonderful “insight” into the minds of the prospect ship owners. As a container ship of the future, it strives to achieve the aim of transporting more cargo with less fuel for a low impact on the environment. The ship specification is 6,200 TEU capacity and operating speed of 21 kts. As the ship’s life may well be 25-30 years, foresight into meeting the changes in legislation, especially emissions and technology is required. Of all the parameters to be considered in designing a new ship, clearly it is the engines, propulsion and auxiliary, that are the foremost concerns for ship owners and in order of importance are efficiency, reliability and emission compliance.

In this month’s DNV Container Ship Update publication, the new container ship survey and design produced under the project name of Quantum brings many subjects together in one report. Although it is a concept ship it is a practical design that could be ordered today but equally well, due to its forward looking design, be ordered, unchanged  five or ten years hence.

The in-depth survey of ship owners asking their desires and preferences prior to designing the Quantum gives a wonderful “insight” into the minds of the prospect ship owners. As a container ship of the future, it strives to achieve the aim of transporting more cargo with less fuel for a low impact on the environment.

The ship specification is of a 6,200 TEU capacity with 1,200 reefer plugs, an operating speed of 21 kts but with the possibility of increasing the speed without undue penalties, yet with a capability to operate efficiently down to 10 kts. As the ship’s life may well be 25-30 years, foresight into meeting the changes in legislation, especially emissions and technology is required. At the same time building-in flexibility to be able to embrace these new technologies as they become available, if not mandatory - for example gen sets being replaced by fuel cells.

In answer to the question, “how would you rank the following items when considering building a new container ship?” The number one item was fuel efficiency, second came operational reliability and third was compliance with future rules and regulations. Of all the parameters to be considered in designing a new ship, clearly it is the engines, propulsion and auxiliary, that are the foremost concerns for ship owners and in order of importance are efficiency, reliability and emission compliance.

Tags: pollution Bay Suisun Maersk Andrew Higgins