28705 members and growing – the largest networking group in the maritime industry!

LoginJoin

Monday, October 21, 2019

Blogs

  • Martin Rushmere (221) (X)

Tags

A Relic of Nineties Rhetoric Slides into the Sea of History

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on January 28, 2011

Conveniently forgotten but in limbo, a maritime dispute that once threatened a trade war has officially faded into obscurity. The ramifications should be remembered. The Federal Maritime Commission jumped on Japan in 1997 over restricted port…

What are you going to Believe...

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on January 20, 2011

Market manipulation is not only the preserve of container lines, but of analysts and forecasters as well. In a case of “everyone’s marching out of step except Harry,” China analytical agencies have come out with a 2011-2012 assessment that flies in the face of what is actually happening.

FMC Tightens the Net in the Trade Lanes...

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on January 14, 2011

Antitrust scrutiny of trans-Pacific carriers has just got a little sharper, or so it would seem. Grand Alliance, the New World Alliance, and CKYH now have to report on route schedules, TEU numbers and deadweight capacity each month instead of quarterly.

Slow Steaming and the FMC Might Pass by as Ships in the Night

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on January 9, 2011

The Federal Maritime Commission is viewed with baleful suspicion as another in the myriad of government agencies that churn out documents and self-evident advice. But its update on events and vision for this year are noteworthy. One of the issues being tackled is slow steaming.

Seattle Shipyard Takeover is a Pointer for 2011

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 30, 2010

Speculation on the forthcoming year has become remarkably sparse in the last couple of years because of the tumultuous events in liner shipping and uncertainty over the international economic situation. But a year-end port-related takeover is…

The Los Angeles Shipyard Tussle Smoothes out

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 23, 2010

The lawsuit problems that Los Angeles faces over the Gambol shipyard seem to be of the straw man variety. Engineering and legal specialists agree that the port is justified in refusing to be deterred from dumping contaminated soil from the main…

Hainan Shipping Gets the Nod from the FMC

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 15, 2010

While all antitrust attention is on The Federal Maritime Commission's views on the carriers' behavior during the crisis two years ago, the commission has allowed a concession that in other times would have gained more notice. Hainan Shipping…

Seattle Signposts the Northwest for Next Year

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 13, 2010

Neat and tidy. That's Seattle's approach to budgeting, which is a model that other ports would do well to follow. The budget for next year gives a very good indication of prospects for liner shipping serving the Pacific Northwest, and these are in the "good to excellent" range.

Los Angeles and Gambol Industries Get Closer to the Rocks

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 2, 2010

Bond ratings for the Port of Los Angeles might just be getting a downgrade within the next year, and by extension, so will those for Long Beach. The Gambol Industries shipyard controversy will be the reason. Gambol's objections center on cost…

Surprises are in Store over Shipping Act Maneuvering

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on November 30, 2010

US maritime politics is getting murkier, who would have thought of it? Just when the straitjacket of antitrust regulation   was about to be wrapped around the  TransPacific Stabilization Agreement, the politicians seemed to be getting ready…

Carriers Are Dancing a Jig of Joy

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on November 21, 2010

What is one to say? The trans-Pacific carriers are taking a risky public stance by sneering at Congress's efforts to put a muzzle on rate discussion powers. First, previous chairman of the 15 lines that make up the TSA, Ron Widdows, gives a…

A Small Leap Forward from a Tiger Grant

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on November 11, 2010

Little is known about how much help the Tiger grants are giving to ports. "The $10 million TIGER II grant – although wonderful and VERY helpful -- doesn’t cover the entire funding gap…which is about $70M." [Estimated cost is $170 million]  "We…

The Shipping Antitrust Law is Dead, while Long Beach's Reputation is at Stake

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on November 4, 2010

The TransPacific Stabilization Agreement is beaming with satisfaction while the Pacific Merchant Shipping Association is unhappy, following the national and state elections this week. James Oberstar's fall from power in Congress means that the anti-trust shipping law is all but dead.

Port of Guam Gears up for its New Role

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on October 28, 2010

Guided missiles rather than ships are a surefire way to get federal funding for ports and the attention of senior officials, with a minimum of hassle. Don't agree? Look no further (6,000 miles to be precise) than Guam. A check for a paltry $50…

Two Surprise Recipients of Tiger Grant Money

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on October 21, 2010

To be woken up and told to be at work to receive a check for $13.5 million must be one of the more pleasant surprises in anyone's career. That is what seems to have happened to Jeffrey Bishop, CEO of Coos Bay port in Oregon. Surprise it certainly was.

2014 Gets More Attention

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on October 14, 2010

Throat clearing, furrowed brows and long pauses between are becoming more common in discussion of the Panama Canal post-2014 and its effects on the West Coast. Those reactions were certainly noticeable at the panel discussion in Long Beach this month.

The Industry Waits for the Usual Follow-My-Leader

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on October 7, 2010

The carriers on the trans-Pacific lane are part of a multi-legged amphibious beetle that carries containers on its back. When the biggest (but not necessarily the strongest or most efficient) leg moves, the industry waits for the rest to paddle forward in unison.

Fuel Consumption Stirs up the Canal Debate

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on September 30, 2010

Different assessments over the Panama Canal effect are sloshing around like bilge water, dirtying the economic and technical impact on the East Coast. The most noteworthy prediction comes from Jim Brennan of logistics and maritime consultancy Norbridge…

A US Politician Invents Time Travel for the Maritime Industry

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on September 23, 2010

That wonderful dreamlike idea of 10 years ago, FastShip, has come up again, with a politician's brilliant invention. The aim was to build Trans-Atlantic cargo vessels that could scoot across at 40 knots, cutting voyage time down to as little as four days.

Cry Babies and Unions Weaken Their Bargaining Position

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on September 17, 2010

When trade unions oppose an economic proposal, you know the measure has merit. That sums up the attitude of the maritime industry today, which is exasperated at the motives and antics of the dockworkers on both seaboards of the country. This puts the container lines in an awkward spot.