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Saturday, August 24, 2019

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  • Martin Rushmere (221) (X)

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LA dominates again in the annual list of TEU imports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on April 30, 2013

The yearly comparisons of container import volumes for the top 20 ports published today by ZEPOL highlight the usual dominance of LA and Long Beach as the two most important gateways in the country. However, the figures should be read very carefully…

More attention to non-container business along the Western Seaboard

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on April 29, 2013

Fracking pops up, followed swiftly by iron ore, aggregates and, to some astonishment, ship breaking. Perhaps the Western Seaboard is after all thinking seriously about moving away from containers, coupled with a hint of purse snatching. is the…

Fracking could be the new future for some ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on April 28, 2013

Northwest and as the door on a coal terminal closes, another opens for hydraulic fracturing (fracking). Gray’s Harbor, normally associated with autos and breakbulk, is eyeing a huge bonanza in the form of crude-by-rail. The stuff will probably come from the fields…

The economics justification for the Jones Act is still not proven

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on March 31, 2013

Pro-Jones Act boosters have been trumpeting a report by the Government Accountability Office, with the American Maritime Partnership saying it proves that the measure has not increased the cost of goods for Puerto Rico. In fact the report says no such thing.

Civil engineers update their report card on ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on March 31, 2013

In what is essentially an update of a 2012 report, The American Society of Civil Engineers has awarded a C grade to the nation’s seaports and their efforts to keep up with essential maintenance and improvement. Much of the report I covered in…

Automation is progressing at California ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on March 30, 2013

The rest of the world laughs in derision, but the truth is that terminal operators in California are doing their best to become more efficient and bring in automation. SSA Marine is at the forefront of this and has been inching along for five years, principally at Long Beach.

Too much focus on the Canal

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on March 29, 2013

The West Coast is taking the wrong approach in worrying about the threat to its ports from the opening of the widened Panama Canal, says industry  John McLaurin. At the Port of Long Beach’s annual Pulse of the Port gathering, a forecast of the year…

More than bananas and rum

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on February 28, 2013

And there you go. Those critics who claim the World Bank steers clear of maritime investment should note that the bank is looking at Kingston, Jamaica. Details are vague so far, but the government wants to expand the port into the major Caribbean…

And the traffic keeps moving away

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on February 28, 2013

The container numbers are in -- and they are making some US Western Seaboard ports more agitated. At the top of the table is Prince Rupert with a year-on-year increase of 38 percent (totaling just over 500,000 TEU), while Metro Vancouver was up 8 percent to a record 2.7 million TEU.

Africa is about to import a bad habit from the US

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on February 27, 2013

The Jones Act could be on its way to Africa. The continent’s seaboard nations (plus a couple of landlocked supporters) want the African Union (the theoretical equivalent of the European Union) to make a law barring non-African-owned vessels from shipping cargo between member countries.

The statistics on California do not tell a lie

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on February 26, 2013

Unwelcome but timely facts have been publicly stated about the competitive race that California ports are losing. At the annual Maritime Leadership Symposium, Mike Jacob of the Pacific Merchant Shipping Association reeled off statistics showing just how the state is losing traction.

...while Long Beach glosses over realities

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on January 31, 2013

Long Beach executive director Chris Lytle took a “rah, rah” approach in the annual State of the Port speech today. Those looking for clues about strategic planning were disappointed, with the theme being one of congratulations to all and sundry at the port.

San Diego gets it ...

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on January 31, 2013

As US ports slide further down the world scale of economic efficiency, confronting rising costs and stricter regulations, executives are realizing that sole reliance on pure maritime business is a slow route to oblivion. The largely forgotten port of San Diego is a prime example.

A bullish start to the year for US ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on January 30, 2013

US ports are reporting some pretty good results for 2012, despite gloomy assessments from economists about the performance of the national economy. What’s more a couple of forecasts for 2013 are surprisingly upbeat, while indications from others show a good first half of their fiscal years.

The marine highway that is becoming less likely

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on January 29, 2013

The San Francisco Bay is enduring unhappy times. Vessels hitting bridges, port executives resigning over expense scandals, strikes and now question marks over a short sea (marine highway) project. Proposed as a commendable alternative to the…

What 2013 should and will bring in

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 31, 2012

Slow steaming in conjunction with the Panama Canal is likely to become even more significant in maritime planning in 2013. Carriers are already rethinking their designs for newbuilds, with one Southeast Asian yard this month getting an order to reshape bows of a number of vessels for a carrier.

The bright spots also have clouds overhead

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 29, 2012

Three bright spots seem to stand out on the western seaboard, Tacoma, Prince Rupert and Metro Vancouver. Tacoma box volumes increased 13 percent for the 11 months to the end of November, with exports up 17 percent and imports 24 percent. Breakbulk volumes were up 77 percent.

West Coast port worries - Part Two

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 21, 2012

The resignation of the two most senior officials at Oakland might appear the worst of the port’s problems. But in fact there’s been a worse development that, ironically, one of the former officials was instrumental in staving off for a while.

Not only the East Coast that is frowning

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 20, 2012

All eyes are on the potential East Coast strike, but ports on the West Coast are suffering in a different  fashion. First, Seattle. Its low sulfur incentive scheme, similar to those of Southern California, is in trouble because a state audit says the rewards are an illegal gift of public money.

Ports that don't make the world go round

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 17, 2012

Facts mixed with omission have gone awry in the furor over the longshore union strike that caused havoc at Los Angeles/Long Beach. The most glaring misunderstanding, which has even reached the pages of Maritime Professional, is the cost of the strike.