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Tuesday, August 20, 2019

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  • Martin Rushmere (221) (X)

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California Might Act Like King Canute

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on April 15, 2010

The California Air Resources Board is smirking. Under the new IMO rules, vessels traveling within the 200-mile control area will have until July of this year to use fuel with no more than 15,000 parts per million. Sulfur content of fuel used in the control areas must be no greater than 10…

Western Ports Get It Done

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on April 8, 2010

Actions speak louder than words, certainly in shipping. Ports can lobby with all their might and industry associations carve out policy frameworks, but the only way to achieve anything is to produce something tangible. In short, the industry is only successful when it builds the future.

Hopes for Upsetting the Transpacific Container Cart

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on April 1, 2010

Shipping line customers on the West Coast are crossing their fingers that the new service by start-up The Containership Company will last long enough to upset the established order on the Pacific route, which is rapidly assuming the guise of a dictatorship.

AAPA Goes Off Base on Port Dredging

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on March 25, 2010

Shipping clamor is mounting over the White House's supposed neglect of seaports. Most notably, the American Association of Port Authorities (AAPA) has been banging away on the need for more dredging and channel widening on both coasts. Mike Leone…

Public/Private Port Partnerships Face unexpected Strain

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on March 18, 2010

Virginia Ports Authority could be setting a bad example for all US ports by entertaining second thoughts – which could be equally well termed second guessing – over the private/public partnership for its cargo terminals. Three investment outfits…

Irrational Exuberance Takes Hold of Better Port Performances

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on March 11, 2010

Cheering news is at last starting to come out of the US maritime sector, but perhaps optimists who have connected the dots are being overcome by wishful thinking. First, the Port of Seattle turned in a profit for 2009, despite an 8 percent fall in revenue, confounding the doom merchants.

Fitch likes LA, Long Beach; says "nah" to Oakland

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on March 4, 2010

Minimum annual guarantees – guaranteed annual payments by port tenants – are looked at with suspicion by some people in the industry, but it turns out that they gain respect from the credit ratings agencies. This has become apparent from Fitch's latest ratings review of US ports.

Thirst for Vengeance Continues over Cosco Busan

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on February 25, 2010

The merry go-round of invective and blame circus has started up again in the wake of the Cosco Busan oil spill in San Francisco Bay in 2007. Fleet Management, the operator at the time, has been fined $10 million in a plea bargain. For the eco-extremists and do-gooders, this is not enough.

Los Angeles Heads for Another Furore

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on February 18, 2010

It’s all about the hoo-hah over the Gambol Industries shipyard, which caters for yacht-sized repairs and construction. At the last minute, Gambol took the port and everyone else by surprise in objecting to a plan to use a long disused area of…

Port Statistics Trip up the Unwary

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on February 11, 2010

Some startling figures have emerged in a newly publicized analysis of maritime imports into the US, produced by Zepol Corporation, a trade analysis and database company. But, like all statistical reports, the numbers have to be looked at carefully.

DC is Cut Out of the Loop in Maritime Planning

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on February 4, 2010

Dredging is getting the heave-ho from the White House and the ports are unhappy. Its woes have garnered the most attention, because of the lobbying power of the AAPA (American Association of Port Authorities), but it's not the only maritime activity that has suffered in the budget.

Transshipment,Transloading, Trans Everything

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on January 28, 2010

The saga of the rivalry between East and West Coast ports has taken a new twist with transshipment and transloading catching the eye of the ever-bewildered container worlds. These two methods have combined to throw in an extra factor into the search for a formula for the ideal route from Asia.

Corporate Initiative to the Rescue

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on January 21, 2010

Corporate initiative is, mostly, an oxymoron, but it has emerged in container shipping in the past year to slow the slide to greater inefficiency at US ports. And in doing so, the initiative has shown that the private sector can tackle bureaucratic and systemic snarl-ups.

Debt Situation Gets Smothered in Accounting Jargon

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on November 26, 2009

The Port of Seattle is yet another public entity that has been forced to cut its coat according to its cloth. The 2010 budget has just been approved by the harbor commissioners --operating expenses for the year reduced by 6 percent and a net operating income of $37 million…

Whining in China -- Instead of Getting the Traffic Moving

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on November 23, 2009

Six ports and two railroads went to China to persuade them to come back to the West Coast. "We are the preferred gateway for Asia cargo to and from the Midwest and cities further east.” "We are the best way to move trade between the U.S. and Asia…

Economics of Port Superiority Show There Is no Room to Be Complacent

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on November 19, 2009

There's a fascinating comparison of shipping costs through different ports that has not been given enough prominence and which Warren Buffett and aspiring shipping moguls would do well to study. The analysis gives a breakdown of the least-cost…

Discount the Impact of Vulture Projects

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on November 16, 2009

Port bosses on the West Coast have been awarded high grades for their foresight, confidence – and courage -- in building new facilities during the slump. That expressive term comes from economist Dan Smith, a principal with international consultants The Tioga Group…

Intermodal Action at the Dock Gates Is Truly on the Way

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on November 12, 2009

Warren Buffett indeed has more on his mind than just railroads. Ports chatter has it that Berkshire Hathaway is staring intermodal transit in the face and wants real action. Recent history plays a part in this, in the form of the contracts (which…

A Pincer Movement to Shake Up U.S. Maritime Trade

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on November 9, 2009

First Warren Buffett and now his international counterpart, George Soros. In the last week, they have caused more speculation in the US container shipping world than events of the last six months. (Slumping volumes asides). Soros has stepped in with a 14 percent chunk of Global Ship Lease…

Sage of Omaha to the Rescue of West Coast Ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on November 5, 2009

If some boring insurance or hedge fund had paid $34 billion for Burlington Northern railroad, the world would have yawned and taken no notice. Instead, the name Warren Buffett is again swirling around the cosmos and experts are in a frenzy as to what it means.