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Wednesday, November 25, 2020

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Battle of Salamis

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 20, 2014

The Battle of Salamis was fought in September 480 BC between the warships of the Greek alliance and the warships of Persian Empire. Following the land battle of Thermopylae and the sea battle of Artemisium, the victorious Persians moved down Attica and conquered the city-state of Athens…

Nereus

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 17, 2014

The Nereus was the most capable research submersible in the world. Built in 2008 by the Deep Submergence Lab at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI), it was named after the Greek sea titan of the same name. The mythological god had a man’s head and body and a fish’s tail.

Principality of Sealand

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 13, 2014

During World War II, British defense forces built a series of structures off the east coast of England to defend against attacks by low-flying German aircraft. There were Army and Navy versions of the so-called Maunsell Forts,. The Navy version…

Goblin shark

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 10, 2014

All, or almost all, sharks look scary, because we know they are among the top predators in the ocean. The goblin shark, though, looks particularly frightful because it is downright weird. In addition to having a twelve-feet-long body that looks like a cross between a shark and sturgeon…

Farley Mowat

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 6, 2014

Farley Mowat, age 92, died on 6 May 2014. In a fifty year career, the Canadian author wrote more than forty books and was awarded numerous honors including the Governor General’s Literary Award and the Order of Canada. His obituary described Mowat as “a trickster…

Museu de Marinha

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 3, 2014

Museu de Marinha is located in the Belém District of Lisbon, near the banks of the Tagus River (Rio Tejo). Administered by the Portuguese Navy, the small museum focuses on the nation’s rich maritime history. Prince Henry the Navigator (1394…

National Maritime Museum

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 30, 2014

The UK’s National Maritime Museum in Greenwich was authorized by the National Maritime Act of 1934 and formally opened by King George VI and Princess Elizabeth on 27 April 1937. It is situated in the Greenwich Royal Park in buildings formally…

Captain-Commandant Ellsworth Bertholf

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 27, 2014

Ellsworth Price Bertholf (1866-1921) entered the Revenue Cutter Service School of Instruction in 1885. Upon graduation in 1887, he was assigned to the USRC Levi Woodbury. After tours on several other cutters along the Gulf and Atlantic coasts…

Korea Coast Guard

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 23, 2014

The Korea Coast Guard was founded in 1953, with assistance from the US Coast Guard. It is therefore not surprising that the primary missions of the younger service follow, to some extent, the primary missions of the older service. The Korea Coast Guard is comprised of approximately 10…

Teak

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 20, 2014

Teak is the common name for the Tectona grandis, a member of the verbena family native to the hardwood forests of India, Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia. It is a large deciduous tree, growing to a height of 130 feet, with gray and grayish brown branches.

Captain Henrik Carlsen

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 16, 2014

Captain Henrik Kurt Carlsen was master of the general cargo ship SS Flying Enterprise on its final voyage. The ship was built in 1944 as the SS Cape Kumukaki for the US War Shipping Administration. Cape Kumukaki, on the Big Island, is the easternmost point of the Hawaiian chain.

Carderock Division

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 13, 2014

The Carderock Division of the Naval Surface Warfare Center, part of the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA), is the United States Navy’s center of excellence for ships and ship systems. It provides full spectrum research and development, test and evaluation…

Icelandic Coast Guard

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 9, 2014

The Icelandic Coast Guard was formally established on 1 July 1926, but traces its heritage to 1859 when Iceland acquired a corvette to patrol local waters. Iceland does not have an army, navy, or air force, so those duties have, by default, fallen on the Coast Guard.

Canadian Transportation Agency

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 6, 2014

The Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) is an independent administrative body of the Government of Canada. It performs two separate, but related functions. As a quasi-judicial tribunal, the Agency, informally or through formal adjudication…

Rail gun

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 2, 2014

The US Navy recently conducted successful tests of its experimental rail gun. The electromagnetic rail gun is a long-range kinetic weapon that fires projectiles using electricity instead of chemical propellants. Magnetic fields created by high…

Admiral Russell R Waesche

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 29, 2014

Admiral Russell R. Waesche, Sr. (1886-1946) served as Commandant of the United States Coast Guard from 14 June 1936 until he retired on 31 December 1945, the longest tenure as Commandant in USCG history. He entered the US Revenue Cutter Service School of Instruction at Arundel Cove (Curtis Bay)…

Fur seals

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 25, 2014

The northern fur seal is the only fur seal residing in the northern hemisphere. With the other fur seals and the sea lions, it is classified as a pinniped, meaning that it has external ears, relatively long and muscular foreflippers, and the ability to walk on all fours…

USRC Harriet Lane

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 22, 2014

The United States Revenue Cutter Harriet Lane was launched in New York on 19 November 1857. An inclined direct-acting steam engine powered two side-wheel paddles. The vessel was also brigantine-rigged, in accordance with common practice in those early days of steam-powered ships.

Sevastopol

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 18, 2014

With a population of approximately 345,000, Sevastopol is the second largest port in Ukraine after Odessa. It is situated on the Black Sea in the southwestern portion of the Crimean Peninsula. By European standards, the city is relatively new…

Dixie cup

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 15, 2014

The sailor’s white canvas hat or “Dixie cup” was incorporated into the United States Navy Uniform Regulations in 1886 to replace the traditional straw hat worn during warm summer months, but it was apparently in use for some time prior to its official adoption.