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Monday, June 21, 2021

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Twilight

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 2, 2010

Twilight is the period before sunrise when darkness is giving way to daylight, and after sunset when daylight is giving way to darkness. It is the result of the sun shining on the upper atmosphere of the Earth, but not on the surface of the Earth at the observer’s location.

CBP Office of Air and Marine

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 30, 2010

A little-known element of the US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is its Office of Air and Marine (OAM). The OAM consists to more than 1,200 federal agents, 290 aircraft, and 225 marine vessels, operating from 79 locations around the United States.

Polaris

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 26, 2010

Polaris (officially known as Alpha Ursae Minoris) is the brightest star in the constellation Ursa Minor or Little Dipper. It lies approximately 400 light years from the Earth and appears in the night sky to be about half-way between the Big Dipper and Cassiopeia.

Maritime Safety and Security Information System

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 23, 2010

The Maritime Safety and Security Information System (MSSIS) is an electronic system for collection and integration of vessel position and related maritime information from participating nations worldwide. It was developed by the Volpe National…

Kiel Canal

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 19, 2010

The Kiel Canal connects the North Sea (at Brunsbüttel) with the Baltic Sea (at Kiel-Holtenau) by means of a 98 kilometer waterway running through Germany’s state of Schleswig-Holstein. For most voyages, it saves approximately 250 nautical miles, by avoiding the transit around the Jutland Peninsula.

US LNG facilities as export sites

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 16, 2010

The world’s first export of liquefied natural gas (LNG) was in 1959, when the Methane Pioneer carried a cargo of LNG from Lake Charles, Louisiana to Canvey Island, United Kingdom. Seven additional cargoes were carried over the next year or so…

Juan de Fuca (1536-1602)

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 12, 2010

Ioannis Fokas was born on the Greek island of Kefallonia in 1536. He died there in 1602. There is no known portrait of him and little is known of the details of his life. There is some evidence that he sailed to the Far East in his youth. In about 1555, he entered the employ of the Kingdom of Spain.

VDR

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 9, 2010

As of 1 July 2010, almost all passenger ships and cargo ships of 3,000 gross tons and greater engaged on international voyages will have installed a voyage data recorder (VDR) or a simplified voyage data recorder (S-VDR), as appropriate. These…

Trireme - dreadnaught of the ancient Mediterranean

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 5, 2010

The trireme was utilized as a warship in the Mediterranean Sea from the 7th century BC until the fall of the Roman Republic at about the commencement of the Christian era. No other warship design has survived in service for a comparable period. It was truly the dominant battleship of its day.

Maritime Safety and Security Teams

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 2, 2010

In the wake of the horrific terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the US Coast Guard identified the need to develop the capacity to counter such threats in the maritime environment. The Maritime Safety and Security Teams (MSSTs) were established to fill this void.

Admiral Ivan Kruzenshtern, Russian Imperial Navy (1770-1846)

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 26, 2010

Though born into a German family (birth name: Adam Johann Ritter von Krusenstern) living in what is now Estonia, he is better known by his Russian name Ivan Fedorovich Kruzenshtern. He joined the Russian Imperial Navy in 1787. He served in the…

Naval Cooperation and Guidance for Shipping

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 23, 2010

Naval control of shipping is a wartime concept, officially defined by the US Department of Defense and by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) as “the control exercised by naval authorities of movement, routing, reporting, convoy organization…

Cinque ports

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 19, 2010

The term “Cinque ports” is Norman French for “five ports”. It refers to the ancient ports of Hastings, New Romney, Hythe, Dover, and Sandwich on the coast of Kent and Sussex in southeast England. In 1155, King Henry II issued a Royal Charter…

Cutter

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 16, 2010

Classically, the term cutter was applied to a single-masted sailing vessel with a topmast and a standing bowsprit, carrying a mainsail, gaff-topsail, stay fore-sail, and jibs. When the US Revenue Marine was established in 1790, all of its original vessels were cutters.

Offshore wind farms

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 12, 2010

Northern European nations have pioneered the development of offshore wind farms, with large developments located along the coasts of Denmark, Germany, and the United Kingdom. There have been complaints about the structures spoiling the view…

Nathaniel Bowditch (1773-1838)

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 9, 2010

Born in Salem, Massachusetts on March 26, 1773, Nathaniel Bowditch had little formal education. He left school at age ten to work in his father’s cooperage. He was then indentured as a bookkeeping apprentice to a ship chandler. Through prodigious self-study…

Binnacle

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 5, 2010

The compass is such a vital part of the safe navigation of a ship that it is traditionally mounted on the bridge on the longitudinal center line directly in front of the helm. The stand on which the compass is placed is called the binnacle.

Load Line

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 2, 2010

While load lines had been used on ships at various times and in various locations throughout history, a systematic program for ship loading regulations originated with Lloyd’s Register of Shipping in 1835. Even then, it was not mandatory for British vessels and was not utilized by foreign shipping.

Particularly Sensitive Sea Areas

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 29, 2010

The Particularly Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA) concept is broadly recognized in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) and specifically authorized in resolutions adopted by the International Maritime Organization (IMO). The…

COSPAS-SARSAT

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 26, 2010

The acronym COSPAS-SARSAT is derived from the Russian term that translates to “Space System for the Search of Vessels in Distress” and the English term “Search and Rescue Satellite-Aided Tracking”. Neither term wholly reflects the role of this Canadian…