28814 members and growing – the largest networking group in the maritime industry!

LoginJoin

Tuesday, December 1, 2020

Blogs

  • Maritime Musings (665) (X)

Tags

Edward Low

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 18, 2015

Edward Low (ca. 1690 – ca. the cruelest pirate, which says a lot. deter resistance. a certain extent. boardings. had resisted. them afire, watching as the flesh burned down to the bone. Low in 1722 was able to escape the next year. pirate. died of their injuries.

William Dampier

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 14, 2015

nearly 64 years. Royal Navy in 1673, a service cut short by illness. Spanish Main and the coast of Peru. and eventually back to England, arriving in 1691. animals and plants. as “A New Voyage Round the World”. vessels. as Terra Australis). and a crew of 50.

Anne Bonny

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 11, 2015

Anne Bonny (1700? about 1700. to Charles Town in the Province of South Carolina. Mary died soon after their arrival. became a merchant and was soon wealthy. (or Annie) grew up to be quite independent and oftentimes defiant. with a sailor and petty criminal named James Bonny.

Samuel Bellamy

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 7, 2015

pirate. period for young men seeking adventure. where he courted the young Maria Hallett. earlier. Maria was pregnant. wedlock. arrival. ship Mary Anne, commanded by Benjamin Hornigold. Hornigold out and elected Bellamy as the new pirate captain. their valuables. and merciful with those he captured.

Jean Bart

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 4, 2015

1650. several miles from the border with Belgium. frequently. to the English in 1658. King Louis XIV purchased Dunkerque from King Charles II for £320,000. been the subject of three kingdoms. the famous Admiral De Ruyter. Dunkerque to fight his previous comrades.

USS Olympia

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 31, 2015

shortages involving its guns and armor plating. the US Asiatic Fleet. designed to correct the deficiencies of a weakened and neglected naval force. rise of the steel shipbuilding industry of the United States. the ship’s twin screws, giving the ship a maximum speed of 21.7 knots.

Shrimp

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 28, 2015

their aquatic habitat by means of swimming. fresh water. small lobsters without claws (there are exceptions). pleopods which are well adapted for swimming. than the body. relatively wide. movement. feeders. of the marine type found in large groups over the continental shelf.

Tidal bore

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 24, 2015

series of waves propagating upstream as the tidal flow turns to rising. bay. flow conditions and the river channel bathymetry. changes in boundary conditions and freshwater inflow. spring tidal ranges and low freshwater flow conditions. wavefront followed by a train of secondary waves.

Basking shark

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 21, 2015

name from its slow speed (about two knots) and its method of feeding. exclusively on plankton and other small plant and animal matter. width and almost three feet vertically). gills. lower jaw. over the gills, it goes through the gill rakers. hooks that trap the food and divert it to the esophagus.

SS City of Cairo

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 17, 2015

convoy vessel. Asian ports, with frequent stops in South Africa. traditional route. important voyage, but ended up being its last. coins. Treasury and were intended for the financial support of the war effort. of Durban, Cape Town, and Pernambuco (now Recife), Brazil.

Leatherback sea turtle

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 14, 2015

The leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) is, as its name implies, the only sea turtle without a bony shell. Rather, the carapace is covered by skin and flesh. It is also the largest of the various sea turtles, having an average carapace length of five feet…

HSK Kormoran

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 10, 2015

The merchant vessel Steiermark was launched in Kiel, Germany in 1938. It was 515 feet in length, displaced 8,700 tons, and was powered by four nine-cylinder diesel engines. It had just completed sea trials when war was declared and the ship…

Tall Ship Sørlandet

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 7, 2015

The tall ship Sørlandet was launched in 1927 in Kristiansand as a training vessel for Norwegian mariners. Displacing 499 tons, it has a length of 208 feet, a beam of 22.3 feet, and a draft of 14.6 feet. Its mainmast has a height above the waterline of 111 feet.

USS United States

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 3, 2015

The Continental Navy was disestablished at the end of the American Revolution. In the early days of the Republic the only armed federal ships were operated by the Revenue Cutter Service. After American merchant ships operating in the Mediterranean came under attack by the Barbary pirates…

USCGC Polar Star

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 30, 2015

The icebreaker USCGC Polar Star (WAGB-10) was commissioned in 1976, following construction by Lockheed Shipbuilding in Seattle. It is 399 feet long, with a beam of 83 feet, a draft of 31 feet, and a standard displacement of 10,863 long tons.

Samuel Cunard

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 26, 2015

Samuel Cunard (1787-1865) was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia. His parents were American Loyalists who moved to Canada at the end of the American Revolutionary War. His father was a master carpenter and timber merchant. Foregoing carpentry, young…

Opah

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 23, 2015

The opah or moonfish is a large pelagic fish with a colorful and deep body. It can grow up to six feet in length with a vertical measurement of over four feet, but a breadth or width of less than eighteen inches. It weighs up to 600 pounds.

Revenue Cutter Ingham

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 19, 2015

The US Revenue Cutter Ingham was launched in 1832 as part of the Morris-Taney class. The cutters were designed for multiple missions including, but not limited to, law enforcement, fighting pirates (which were particularly prevalent in the Gulf of Mexico and around Cuba), and augmenting the US Navy.

Bone-eating worms

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 16, 2015

First discovered on the deep seafloor of Monterey Bay in 2002, bone-eating worms (Osedax) seem to dine exclusively on the bones of whale carcasses that fall to the ocean floor (so-called whale falls). They are about one inch in length and composed entirely of soft tissue.

Royal Charter Storm

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 12, 2015

The super-storm of 25-28 October 1859 struck southeast England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the Irish Sea with unexpected force, causing extensive damage at sea and ashore before moving on the Norway, albeit with diminished impact. It arose in the English Channel…