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Friday, August 6, 2021

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Santo Domingo

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 7, 2012

Santo Domingo, on the southern coast of Hispaniola at the mouth of the Ozama River, is the capital and largest city in the Dominican Republic. It was founded in 1496 by Christopher Columbus’ brother Bartholomew and originally called La Neuva Isabella, in honor of Queen Isabella of Spain.

MQ-4C Triton

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 4, 2012

On 14 June 2012, the US Navy unveiled its Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) MQ-4C Triton unmanned aircraft system, built by Northrop Grumman. The aircraft is intended to provide continuous maritime surveillance and to complement the Boeing P-8 Poseidon Multi-mission Maritime Aircraft.

Aurora Australis

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 30, 2012

The Aurora Australis was built in Newcastle, New South Wales in 1989 and entered service in 1990. It is owned and operated by P&O Maritime Services and is regularly chartered by the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD), the Australian government agency in charge of polar programs.

SS Vestris

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 27, 2012

The SS Vestris was built in Belfast and launched on 16 May 1912. Unlike the Titanic, built in a nearby shipyard at the same time, its launching received little notice because there was nothing unusual about the Vestris. At 10,494 gross tons and 496 feet in length…

HMS Captain

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 23, 2012

In the mid-nineteenth century, development of naval weaponry was outpacing development of naval propulsion. Ocean-going warships of the era still had to rely on sails, because steam engines were insufficiently reliable for use as the sole means of propulsion.

Sable Island

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 20, 2012

Sable Island is a tiny speck in the North Atlantic about 100 miles southeast of Nova Scotia. Shaped like a very thin crescent moon, it is 26 miles long, but less than a mile wide at its widest point. The highest elevation of its sand dunes is approximately 12 feet.

Prestige oil spill

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 16, 2012

On 13 November 2002, while carrying a cargo of 77,000 metric tons of heavy fuel oil from St. Petersburg, Russia and Ventspils, Latvia to Singapore, the Aframax tanker Prestige encountered heavy weather off the northwest coast of Spain. The tanker…

Canadian polar icebreakers

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 13, 2012

The Canadian Coast Guard currently operates two heavy polar icebreakers: CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent and CCGS Terry Fox. It also operates four medium icebreakers: CCGS Amundsen (nee CCGS Sir John Franklin); CCGS Henry Larsen; CCGS Des Groseilliers; and CCGS Pierre Radisson. The Louis S.

Sikuliaq

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 9, 2012

The research vessel Sikuliaq was launched at the Marinette Marine Shipyard in Wisconsin on 13 October 2012. The National Science Foundation (NSF) vessel will be operated by the University of Alaska Fairbanks School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences.

Havana

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 6, 2012

Havana is the capital, largest city, and principal port of Cuba. It is located on the northern coast of the island, adjacent to the Straits of Florida, which connects the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. Christopher Columbus was the European discoverer of Cuba…

Visby

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 2, 2012

Visby is the historic city on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea off the coast of Sweden. It was a center for maritime trade throughout the Baltic as early as 900 A.D. and became sufficiently rich and important to erect defensive walls around the city in the twelfth century.

Carthage

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 30, 2012

Carthage, located in present-day Tunisia near the capital of Tunis, was settled in about 814 B.C. by Phoenician mariners from Tyre. Its position near the center of the Mediterranean Sea proved to be an ideal point for trade and for controlling strategic lanes of commerce.

Harfleur

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 26, 2012

Harfleur was known in Roman times as Caracotinum and was the principal port of the region. It is located about four miles north of the River Seine, but in ancient times, the river flowed directly adjacent to the city. After the Viking invasion in the ninth century…

Ile d’Oléron

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 23, 2012

Oléron is a moderate-sized (about 175 square kilometers) island off the Atlantic coast of France, just north of where the Gironde estuary flows into the Bay of Biscay. During the Middle Ages, it served as a significant port for the exportation of Bordeaux wine to consumers in western Europe…

Acre

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 19, 2012

Acre (previously known as Akko or Akka) is an ancient seaport located in what is now the northern portion of the Port of Haifa, Israel. It was part of Canaan prior to being conquered by Alexander the Great in 332 BC. Later, it was controlled by the Roman and then the Byzantine Empire.

Tyre

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 16, 2012

Tyre, located on the Mediterranean coast in southern Lebanon, was founded, according to the ancient historian Herodotus, in about 2750 BC. At that time, it was an island a mile or so off the mainland. It had two fine harbors – one on the north side and one on the south side.

Whale shark

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 12, 2012

The whale shark is found in all the tropical and temperate marine waters except, so far as is known, the Mediterranean Sea and the Black Sea. It grows up to 20 meters in length and can weigh up to 30 tonnes. It is the largest living non-mammalian…

HMS Beagle

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 9, 2012

HMS Beagle was commissioned in 1820 as a 10-gun brig, but never sailed as such, except on a ceremonial voyage to London. After lying “in ordinary” (laid up) for five years, she was refitted as a six-gun barque (with the addition of a mizzen mast and the removal of four guns).

Captain William Bainbridge USN

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 5, 2012

William Bainbridge (1774-1833) entered the US merchant marine in 1789, the same year that George Washington became President. Through self-education and hard work, he quickly became a mate and, at age 19, was given command of the merchant ship Hope (140 tons with four nine-pound guns). While off St.

Admiral Hyman G. Rickover

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 2, 2012

Hyman Rickover was born in Poland in 1900. He and his family emigrated to the United States in 1906, fleeing anti-Semitic pogroms. Rickover graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1922 and soon became engineering officer on a destroyer. After a tour on the battleship USS Nevada…