28895 members and growing – the largest networking group in the maritime industry!

LoginJoin

Tuesday, August 3, 2021

Blogs

  • Maritime Musings (665) (X)

Tags

T-3

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 15, 2013

T-3, also known as Fletcher’s Ice Island, was a large iceberg in the Arctic Ocean used for many years as a scientific research facility by the United States Government. It was identified in 1947 by USAF Colonel Joseph O. Fletcher. Following the end of World War II…

Seahorse

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 12, 2013

The seahorse (genus Hippocampus) is a true, albeit strange-looking, fish. It shares the family Syngnathidae with the pipefish. Like other fish, it breathes through gills. But it lacks scales. Its skin is stretched over a series of interlocking bony plates…

Spanish treasure convoys

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 8, 2013

The Spanish did not invent the convoy system, where a number of ships sail together to provide mutual protection. Convoys were utilized by the Greeks and Romans and, perhaps by the ancient Egyptians. The Spanish, though, regularized the process.

USS Hatteras

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 5, 2013

The gunboat USS Hatteras started its brief career as the SS St. Mary. It was purchased by the Union Navy shortly after the outbreak of the Civil War. The Navy was in need of steam-powered ships to participate in the Anaconda Plan, devised by…

Belt and suspenders

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 1, 2013

Following the grounding of the conical drill unit (CDU) Kulluk on Sitkalidak Island, a number of environmental advocates have called for a ban on oil and gas drilling in Arctic waters. The argument is that such offshore drilling in a harsh environment…

Selendang Ayu injustice

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 29, 2013

On 6 December 2004, the bulk carrier Selendang Ayu was en route from Seattle, Washington to Xiamen, China carrying 66,000 tons of soybeans. It also had approximately 340,000 gallons of bunkers and other petroleum products (lubricants, etc.) on board.

50 Let Pobedy

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 25, 2013

The 50 Let Pobedy is a Russian Arktika-class nuclear icebreaker. The name translates in English literally to “50 Years of Victory”, but more properly means “Fiftieth Anniversary of Victory”. Original plans called for the ship to be launched in 1995, the 50th anniversary of the end of World War II.

RMS Laconia

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 22, 2013

The Royal Mail Ship (RMS) Laconia entered service in 1922 as a Cunard ocean liner, engaged primarily in the trans-Atlantic trade. It replaced the previous Laconia (built 1911), which had been sunk during the First World War. At 601 feet in length…

S.A. Agulhas II

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 18, 2013

The Agulhas II replaces the older and smaller Agulhas as South Africa’s supply vessel for its scientific and weather stations in Antarctica (SANAE IV located on a rocky outcrop several miles inland in the Queen Maud region); on Marion Island…

NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 15, 2013

The research vessel Ronald H. Brown (R 104) is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). At a length of 274 feet and a displacement of 3,250 tons, it is the largest NOAA vessel. Delivered in 1997, it was the agency’s first new oceanographic research vessel in 17 years.

Pygmy right whale

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 11, 2013

The pygmy right whale is a small baleen whale found exclusively in waters of the Southern Ocean. Because it does not frequent shallow water and is of a size of no commercial value, it is little studied. It was first documented based on bones…

Nunavik

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 8, 2013

Nunavik is a semi-autonomous region of northern Quebec, including the Ungava Peninsula. The northern portion of Nunavik is in the Arctic climate zone, while the southern portion is considered sub-Arctic. The sparsely populated region is rich in mineral resources.

Marine Hospital Service

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 4, 2013

The US Marine Hospital Service was modeled after the system in the United Kingdom for providing medical care for members and veterans of the merchant marine. It was created by passage in 16 July 1798 of the Act for the Relief of Sick and Disabled Seamen.

Lazaretto

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 1, 2013

A lazaretto was a quarantine station for maritime travelers and cargo. The concept of quarantine derives from the imposition of forty days (quarto) of isolation imposed by various Mediterranean powers (primarily by Venice) in the late Middle…

Fruit juice tankers

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 28, 2012

There are at least eleven dedicated fruit juice tankers currently in operation. Six are operated by Atlanship SA of Lausanne, Switzerland; four are operated by Aleuropa of Hamburg, Germany; and one is operated by Northern Navigation Norway of Oslo, Norway.

Christmas Island

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 25, 2012

Christmas Island is a territory of Australia, located in the Indian Ocean approximately 1,600 miles northwest of Perth and about 200 miles south of Java, Indonesia. It was uninhabited until discovered by Captain William Mynors (on the Royal Mary)…

Bitumen

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 21, 2012

Bitumen or asphalt is a naturally-occurring form of petroleum or crude oil. Unlike common crude oil, though, it is highly viscous and often semi-solid. In previous times, it was referred to as pitch. Ancient peoples used bitumen for a variety of purposes…

Dynamic positioning

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 18, 2012

Dynamic positioning developed in the 1960s in the offshore oil and gas drilling industry when efforts began entering waters too deep for use of either jack-up rigs or anchor spreads as a means of keeping the rig precisely located over the drill site.

USS Enterprise

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 14, 2012

The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was deactivated at Naval Station Norfolk on 1 December 2012, after 50 years of ground-breaking service. The 1,123-foot long vessel was laid down in 1958 and entered service in 1962 as the world’s first nuclear powered surface warship.

SS Hannah M. Bell

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 11, 2012

The 315-foot long steamship Hannah M. Bell was built in England in 1893. It primarily carried sugar, cotton, and other breakbulk cargo between Europe and the Americas. On 4 April 1911, while transiting from the US east coast to Vera Cruz, Mexico with a cargo of coal…