28895 members and growing – the largest networking group in the maritime industry!

LoginJoin

Tuesday, August 3, 2021

Blogs

  • Maritime Musings (665) (X)

Tags

Ideal X

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 26, 2013

On 26 April 1956, the ship Ideal X departed Port Newark, New Jersey on a voyage to Houston, Texas. The ship had been launched in 1945 as the T-2 tanker SS Potrero Hills. The ship had made many voyages in the intervening eleven years, but this was different.

Barnacle

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 23, 2013

The lowly barnacle has intrigued and been detested by mariners from time immemorial. It is a small arthropod with a complex life cycle. Once the fertilized egg is released into the water by the female, it hatches into a nauplius – a one-eyed larva consisting of a head and a tail fan for locomotion.

US Derelict Destroyer SENECA

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 19, 2013

The United States Revenue Cutter SENECA was the first and only US Government seagoing vessel built expressly as a derelict destroyer. Launched in 1908, the 1,259 ton vessel was commissioned into the Revenue Cutter Service for the principal mission of locating distressed vessels…

Texas City disaster

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 16, 2013

The worst industrial accident in US history occurred on 16 April 1947, in the port of Texas City, Texas. The freighter GRANDCAMP, with a cargo of ammonium nitrate, small arms ammunition, machinery, and sisal twine, caught fire. The fire quickly spread to the nearby freighter HIGH FLYER…

SBX-1

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 12, 2013

SBX-1 is the US Navy designation for its self-propelled radar vessel. The designation is short for Sea-Based X-Band Radar-1. The vessel started life as a CS-50 twin-hull semi-submersible drilling rig. It was built in the Vyborg shipyard in Russia in 2002.

Guinness fleet

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 9, 2013

From shortly after its founding in Dublin in 1759, the Guinness Brewery Company has shipped beer in various forms (lager, ale, porter, and stout) to thirsty consumers in England. For many years the barrels were transported in commercial vessels.

Popeye the Sailorman

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 5, 2013

Popeye first appeared in the Thimble Theatre comic strip on 17 January 1929. He was hired by Olive Oyl’s brother Castor Oyl to take Castor and a friend to Dice Island, an offshore gambling casino, where they engaged in various adventures and misadventures.

European discovery of Florida

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 2, 2013

On 2 April 1513 (500 years ago, for those who have lost count), a fleet of three Spanish ships commanded by Juan Ponce de León sighted land west of the Bahamas. He believed it to be another island and named it La Florida (the Flowery Isles) in recognition of its verdant landscape.

Inspection of steamboats

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 29, 2013

On 7 July 1838, Congress enacted a statute requiring, for the first time, that vessels propelled in whole in part by steam undergo inspection prior to a license being issued. Since there was no federal agency charged with performing such inspections…

Licensing of mates

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 26, 2013

On 23 March 1898, Congress enacted into law an act authorizing the licensing of mates on river and ocean steamers. Up until then, only masters and engineering officers on steam powered vessels were required to hold licenses. The new law provided…

MV Queen of the North

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 22, 2013

The ro-ro ferry remembered as Queen of the North was built in Germany in 1969 and originally named MV Stena Danica. It operated between Gothenburg, Sweden and Frederikshavn, Denmark until 1974, when it was purchased by BC Ferries. Renamed MV Queen of Surrey…

CG 36500

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 19, 2013

The US Coast Guard motor lifeboat 36500 is the only one of the many hundreds that were built between the 1930s and the 1950s to be placed on the National Register of Historic Places. On 18 February 1952, during a severe winter storm off Cape Cod…

Motorboat Act of 1910

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 15, 2013

The Motorboat Act was adopted into law on June 9, 1910. It established for the first time requirements for vessels propelled by machinery that were not more than 65 feet in length. Vessels propelled by steam had been regulated for many years.

SS Arctic

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 12, 2013

When the side-paddle steamer Arctic was launched in 1850, it was the best-outfitted ship in the England-New York trade. Oak framed with pine planking, its basic construction was old school, but it was fitted with steam engines driving large side-mounted paddles…

Guar

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 8, 2013

The guar has been cultivated in arid portions of northwest India and adjacent Pakistan since time immemorial. It is an annual legume, producing up to twelve oval seeds in each thin pod. It is relatively hardy, requiring little care other than weeding when young…

Russian nuclear icebreaker Rossiya

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 5, 2013

The Rossiya is the third in the Arktika-class of Russian nuclear icebreakers. It was launched in 1985 and is the oldest of the four remaining active heavy nuclear icebreakers in the Russian fleet. There are also two shallow-draft nuclear icebreakers that work primarily on northern rivers.

MV Lyubov Orlova

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 1, 2013

The ice-strengthened cruise ship Lyubov Orlova was built in Croatia in 1976 for operation under the Soviet-Russian flag. Measuring 4,251 gross tons and with a length of 295 feet, it could carry up to 110 passengers. It operated out of Vladivostok…

Battle of Cornwall

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 26, 2013

The Anglo-Spanish War ran intermittently from 1585 until signing of the Treaty of London in 1604. The Spanish Armada of 1588 is remembered as the seminal event of the conflict, but there were numerous other armed confrontations. One of the most…

HMT Lancastria

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 22, 2013

Operation Dynamo (the evacuation of over 300,000 British and French troops from Dunkirk in early June 1940) was followed by two lesser-known evacuations. Operation Cycle involved the evacuation of 11,000 Allied troops from Le Harve on 10-13 June.

Dodo

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 19, 2013

The Dodo was a large flightless bird found solely on the island of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean. It was a member of the pigeon family, but highly unusual. The adult male stood over three feet high and could weigh up to 40 pounds. As it had…