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Saturday, July 31, 2021

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Gay Head Light

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 5, 2013

The Gay Head Light is located on Gay Head (or the Gay headland) in Aquinnah on the western end of Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts. On July 16, 1798, Congress directed the establishment of a lighthouse at “Gay-head” on Martha’s Vineyard and the appointment of a person to superintend same.

British Navigation Acts

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 2, 2013

The British Navigation Acts (originally the English Navigation Acts) were a series of increasingly restrictive cabotage laws designed to curtail use of foreign bottoms (ships) for foreign trade to or from Britain and throughout the British Empire.

USS Cyclops

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 28, 2013

The USS Cyclops (AC-4) was a twin-engine, twin-screw US Navy collier. When launched in 1910, it operated in the Naval Auxiliary Service, which was somewhat similar to the Military Sealift Command. Its homeport was Norfolk, Virginia. The ship’s master was George W.

Italian Coast Guard

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 25, 2013

The Italian Coast Guard is commonly known as the Guardia costiera, but its official name is “Corpo delle Capitanerie di porto” or the Corps of the Port Captaincies. It is part of the Italian Navy, but administratively is located in Ministry of Infrastructure and Transport.

Barents Sea

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 21, 2013

The Barents Sea is named for the Dutch navigator, cartographer, and explorer Willem Barents, who mapped the area during expeditions in the late 1500’s. Historically, the Russians referred to it as the Sea of Murmans. It is located north of eastern Norway and western Russia.

ILV Granuaile

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 18, 2013

The Irish Lights aids to navigation vessel ILV Granuaile is the third ship to bear this name. When delivered in January 2000, it was possibly the most advanced vessel of its type in the world. Designed to operate in difficult conditions offshore Ireland year round…

Arctic Council

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 14, 2013

The Arctic Council is an intergovernmental organization of the eight nations that at least a portion of which is located in the Arctic region. These nations are, in alphabetical order: Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and the United States.

Iceberg Smith

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 11, 2013

Edward H. “Iceberg” Smith (1889-1961) retired from active duty with the US Coast Guard in 1950, forty years after entering the US Revenue Cutter Service (USRCS) School of Instruction as a cadet. The School at that time was onboard the Revenue Practice Cutter ITASCA…

C. S. Forester

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 7, 2013

Cecil Scott “CS” Forester was the pen name of Cecil Louis Troughton Smith (1899-1966), an English novelist and screenwriter. He was born in Cairo (Egypt was then under British administration), raised in England, and spent his last 27 years living in the United States.

Ice island becoming ice islet

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 4, 2013

The Russian Federal Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring devoted considerable time and effort into selection of a suitable ice island in the Arctic Ocean to replace the 39th in its long series of floating meteorological and scientific research facilities.

MV Ortelius

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 31, 2013

Among the various passenger ships utilized for polar excursions is the MV Ortelius. Built in 1989 as the Marina Svetaeva, it was designed as a special purpose vessel for the Soviet Academy of Science and used for polar research. Later, the ice…

Algae blooms

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 28, 2013

Algae are single-celled protists (primitive organisms with both plant and animal characteristics) also known as phytoplankton. There are a wide variety of algae and they are commonly found in fresh water and marine environments. In certain conditions…

MV St. Louis

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 24, 2013

The motor vessel St. Louis was launched in 1928. Owned by the Hamburg-America Line, the passenger vessel made regular crossings from Hamburg to Halifax and New York. It also made occasional leisure cruises in the West Indies in winter months.

Muskox

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 21, 2013

The muskox derives its name from the strong odor emitted by the male of the species to attract females during mating season, the animals not being familiar with online dating and lacking reliable cell phone service. They belong to the family Bovidae, along with sheep and goats.

Jacques Cousteau

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 17, 2013

Jacques-Yves Cousteau (1910-1997) was an oceanographic technician, explorer, conservationist, author, and film-maker. He served in the French Navy from 1930 through World War II. It was during the war that he and a friend developed the Aqua-Lung, an open-circuit breathing regulator.

Naval stores

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 14, 2013

Originally, the term naval stores referred to anything and everything used in the construction and maintenance of ships. Gradually though, the term narrowed to mean tar, pitch, turpentine, rosin, and similar products used to keep wooden ships watertight and to reduce wear and tear.

Stad ship tunnel

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 10, 2013

In a move reminiscent of the Athos Canal, built 483-480 BC at the direction of the Persian Emperor Xerxes, or the Corinth Canal, built in the 1890’s by the Greek Government, Norway has tentatively approved construction of a tunnel through the…

Tower of the Winds

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 7, 2013

The Tower of the Winds (also referred to as a horologion or timepiece) is a 40-foot high octagonal structure that was built in the Agora of Athens in about 100 BC. At the time, the Agora was the political and economic center of the city. This…

Picton Castle

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 3, 2013

The barque Picton Castle is a commercial sail training vessel homeported in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia and registered in the Cook Islands. It was built in Swansea, Wales in 1928 as a motorized fishing trawler and named for the local Welsh castle.

FLIP

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 30, 2013

The Floating Instrument Platform (FLIP) is a non-self-propelled open ocean research vessel owned by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and operated by the Marine Physical Laboratory of the Scripps Institute of Oceanography. It was built in 1962 to study wave height…