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Sunday, June 13, 2021

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Agadir Canyon

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 31, 2014

Agadir Canyon and its associated Basin are located in the North Atlantic Ocean off the northwest cost of Morocco. The earth’s crust in this vicinity is very stable, with minimal earthquakes. This has allowed the sediment, mostly washing down from the Atlas Mountains and surrounding areas…

Portuguese India

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 28, 2014

Portuguese India was founded in 1505 when Francisco de Almeida was appointed Viceroy of India. Vasco da Gama had found the sea route from Portugal in 1498, establishing a small trading factory in Calicut. Pedro Álvares Cabral established two more at Cochin and Cannanore in 1500.

Richard Henry Dana, Jr

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 24, 2014

Richard Henry Dana, Jr. (1815-1882) was a distinguished Massachusetts lawyer and political activist from an eminent New England family. He was one of the leading admiralty lawyers of his day, but gained more renown (and more than a few enemies) by advocating for the rights of merchant sailors…

Best bottle

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 21, 2014

It’s been sixty years since the event described below occurred. The statute of limitations has long passed. The following is taken the book Wine Talk written in 1978 by Frank J. Prial, wine columnist of the New York Times: “Caught up in a game of ‘best bottle’…

Rideau Canal

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 17, 2014

The Rideau Canal in Canada shares two similarities with the Kiel Canal in Germany. The Kiel Canal was constructed primarily for military reasons – to enhance the mobility of the German Imperial Fleet between the Baltic Sea and the North Sea.

Socotra Rock

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 14, 2014

Socotra Rock (not to be confused with Socotra Island in the Gulf of Aden) is a submerged rock in the northern portion of the East China Sea. It lies about 15 feet below the surface, the apex of a rocky peak or sea mount rising about 200 feet above the seabed.

Seaweed

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 10, 2014

Seaweed is not a true plant; rather it is a generic term for macroscopic, multicellular benthic marine algae. Scientists tend to classify seaweed by color, with the primary groups being red, green, and brown. Some blue green algae are often categorized as seaweed.

USS Michigan

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 7, 2014

As a consequence of the Upper Canada Rebellion of 1837-38, the Royal Navy employed two armed steamers on Lake Erie. These were the first armed vessels on the Great Lakes since the end of the War of 1812. In response, the United States Navy determined to employ its own warship on the Great Lakes.

Macau

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 3, 2014

Macau was just an ordinary island off the southeastern coast of China until it was selected by the Portuguese as their main trading base for the Orient. Jorge Álvares landed on Lintin Island, Guangdong, China in May 1513. He was followed in 1516 by Rafael Perestrello…

Maui’s dolphin

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 31, 2013

The New Zealand Department of Conservation recently expanded the existing ban on set net fishing off the west coast of the North Island by an additional 350 square kilometers in an effort to reverse the decline in numbers of Maui’s dolphin.

Saint Peter & Saint Paul Archipelago

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 27, 2013

The Saint Peter & Saint Paul Archipelago (Penedos de São Pedro e São Paulo) was “discovered” when the Portuguese caravel São Pedro rammed into it during the dark night of 20 April 1511. The caravel was one of six on a trading voyage to India.

Submarine NR-1

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 24, 2013

The US Navy submarine NR-1 was the smallest nuclear submarine ever built and the only US Navy submarine to never be commissioned. Launched in 1969, it had been built largely as an experiment by Admiral Hyman Rickover to determine whether such a small vessel could meet his exacting requirements.

Madagascar

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 20, 2013

Madagascar is a large island in the Indian Ocean located 250 miles off the southeast coast of Africa. Now home to the Republic of Madagascar, the island was first settled by natives of Borneo, who arrived in waves by outrigger canoe between 350 BC and 550 AD.

Tethered aerostat radar system

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 13, 2013

Included in the Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 (the legislation that ended the partial shutdown of the federal government) was a provision directing the US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to sustain “the operation of Tethered Aerostat Radar Systems”.

Horseshoe crab

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 17, 2013

The horseshoe crab is a marine arthropod of the subphylum Chelicerata. It is more closely related to arachnids, such as spiders and scorpions, than it is to arthropods, such as true crabs and insects. Horseshoe crab fossils date back to 450 million years ago.

Strict criminal liability and the MBTA

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 10, 2013

When Congress enacted the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) in 1918, the statute was intended to implement the treaty with Great Britain (acting on behalf of Canada) largely to control the over-hunting of migratory birds that were shared by the neighboring nations.

Panfilo de Narvaez

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 6, 2013

Panfilo de Narvaez was born in Valladolid, Spain in about 1470. He was among the first Spanish settlers on the island of Jamaica. In 1511, he joined the campaign of Diego Velásquez to pacify Cuba, commanding a company of archers. At the successful conclusion of that campaign…

Elisha Kane

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 3, 2013

Elisha Kent Kane (1820-1857) was born in Philadelphia and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1842. Joining the United States Navy as a medical officer, he served in the China Commercial Treaty mission of 1844, in the Africa Squadron…

USS Demologos

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 29, 2013

During the War of 1812, concern arose regarding a possible attack by the Royal Navy on the Port of New York. After all, the British had attacked and burned Washington, DC and the US victory at Baltimore was a near-thing. On 9 March 1814, Congress appropriated the sum of $500…

Benjamin Leigh Smith

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 26, 2013

Benjamin Leigh Smith was born in the Sussex countryside, the illegitimate son of a Radical Whig politician. He lived the stigma of illegitimacy for his entire life and was always very shy. Leigh Smith entered Jesus College, Cambridge at age twenty, earning a BA in 1857 and a Master’s degree in 1861.