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Tuesday, December 1, 2020

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  • Maritime Musings (665) (X)

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Fumigation

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 11, 2014

Fumigation is a method of pest control that completely fills an area with gaseous pesticides to suffocate, poison, or otherwise kill the pests within. It is used for control of pests in buildings, the soil, and food stuffs. In the maritime industry…

Malacca

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 8, 2014

The Strait of Malacca is named after Malacca, now part of Malaysia. In about the year 1400, Parameswana, the last Raja of Singapura, was expelled from the area around present-day Singapore by local rivals. He relocated to the fishing village of Malacca…

Virgin Islands

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 4, 2014

The name of this archipelago at the far western end of the Leeward Islands of the Caribbean derives from Christopher Columbus, who “discovered” them on his second voyage to the New World on October 21, 1493. He named them after Saint Ursula and the 11…

Elephant seal

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 1, 2014

Elephant seals are large seals represented by two species, the northern elephant seal and the southern elephant seal. Both were hunted to near extinction through the end of the nineteenth century. The smaller northern elephant seal is found in the eastern portion of the North Pacific Ocean…

MV Ebb Tide

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 28, 2014

Offshore drilling for oil and gas began tentatively shortly after the end of World War II with work off piers in California. By 1947, drilling was begun in waters of the Gulf of Mexico over 40 miles off the coast of Louisiana. Initially, fishing vessels…

Danforth anchor

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 25, 2014

The Danforth anchor is a lightweight anchor developed by Richard S. Danforth in 1939 for use aboard landing craft. It is referred to as a stock-stabilized, pivoting fluke anchor. Its main characteristic is the placement of its large flukes at…

Antipodes Islands

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 21, 2014

The Antipodes Islands, located in the southwest Pacific Ocean south of New Zealand, were originally called the Penantipodes Islands because they are the nearest land to being directly opposite on the globe from (or antipodal to) London, England.

AUTEC

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 18, 2014

The Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) is a United States Navy command for testing and evaluation of submarines, in addition to other missions. Its headquarters facility is located in West Palm Beach, Florida, while its operational…

McMurdo Sound

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 14, 2014

McMurdo Sound (approximately 35 miles long and 30 miles wide) connects the Ross Sea to the north to the Ross Ice Shelf on the coast of Antarctica due south of New Zealand. This body of water, frequently ice-covered, was discovered by Captain…

USS Forrestal

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 11, 2014

The revolutionary USS Forrestal (CV-59) was commissioned in 1959, named for the first Secretary of Defense. It was the first super-carrier – designed and constructed to handle jet aircraft and with an angled flight deck, steam catapult, and an optical landing system.

USS Somerset

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 7, 2014

The amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25) was commissioned in Philadelphia on 1 March 2014. It is the ninth ship in the San Antonio class. These ships incorporate both a flight deck and a well deck. The flight deck can accommodate…

Saint Martin

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 4, 2014

The small (34 square miles) island in the northeastern Caribbean was “discovered” by Christopher Columbus on his second voyage on 11 November 1493 and named for Saint Martin of Tours, whose feast day it was. The Spanish, though, were more interested in the larger islands…

James Shoal

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 28, 2014

James Shoal is a submerged coral reef in the southern portion of the South China Sea approximately 50 nautical miles off the coast of the island of Borneo. With an average depth beneath the water of over 50 feet, the shoal may not be used by any nation to assert a claim of a territorial sea.

USRC Massachusetts

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 25, 2014

The Revenue Cutter Massachusetts was one of the first ten authorized by the US Congress in legislation enacted on 4 August 1790. It was not the first revenue cutter to be launched (on 15 July 1791), but is believed to be the first to become operational.

Francois Thurot

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 21, 2014

Francois Thurot (1727-1760) was born to modest circumstances in Dijon, France. After a short apprenticeship, in 1744 he signed on as surgeon on a French privateering vessel, which was promptly captured by the Royal Navy during the War of the Austrian Succession.

William Lewis Herndon

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 18, 2014

William Lewis Herndon (1813-1857) was appointed Midshipman in the relatively new United States Navy in 1828, serving afloat in the Pacific, Atlantic, Mediterranean, and Gulf of Mexico. From 1842 through 1847, he served at the new Naval Observatory and Hydrographic Office in Washington…

Hudson River

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 14, 2014

The Oxford English Dictionary defines “fiord” as a long narrow inlet of sea between high cliffs. The only significant watercourse on the east coast of the United States is the Hudson River. It extends 315 miles from Lake Henderson in northern New York to the Atlantic Ocean via New York Bay.

Excursion vessels in polar waters

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 11, 2014

The world was recently witness to a multi-national effort to rescue the Russian excursion vessel Akademik Shokalskiy after it was beset in wind-driven ice off the coast of Antarctica. The French supply vessel L’Astrolabe turned back from its relief effort.

L’Astrolabe

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 7, 2014

L’Astrolabe is an Antarctic oceanographic and logistic support vessel flying the French flag, operated by P&O Maritime Services, and owned by SURF of Marseille, France. It is on long-term charter to the French Polar Institute. Classed with Bureau Veritas…

ScanEagle

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 4, 2014

The ScanEagle is a small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) designed specifically for maritime reconnaissance. It has a 10 foot wingspan, a length of 4.5 feet, weighs 44 pounds, and a cruising speed of 48 knots. With a flight endurance of 20 hours…