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Wednesday, July 29, 2015

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Shrimp

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 28, 2015

their aquatic habitat by means of swimming. fresh water. small lobsters without claws (there are exceptions). pleopods which are well adapted for swimming. than the body. relatively wide. movement. feeders. of the marine type found in large groups over the continental shelf.

Go East, Young Man, Go East

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on July 24, 2015

A recent report from Zepol, a Minnesota-based company that provides U.S. import and export data, implies that importers are beginning to move their business from the U.S. West Coast to East Coast ports. In fact, they characterize the trend as…

Tidal bore

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 24, 2015

series of waves propagating upstream as the tidal flow turns to rising. bay. flow conditions and the river channel bathymetry. changes in boundary conditions and freshwater inflow. spring tidal ranges and low freshwater flow conditions. wavefront followed by a train of secondary waves.

Basking shark

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 21, 2015

name from its slow speed (about two knots) and its method of feeding. exclusively on plankton and other small plant and animal matter. width and almost three feet vertically). gills. lower jaw. over the gills, it goes through the gill rakers. hooks that trap the food and divert it to the esophagus.

SS City of Cairo

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 17, 2015

convoy vessel. Asian ports, with frequent stops in South Africa. traditional route. important voyage, but ended up being its last. coins. Treasury and were intended for the financial support of the war effort. of Durban, Cape Town, and Pernambuco (now Recife), Brazil.

Leatherback sea turtle

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 14, 2015

The leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) is, as its name implies, the only sea turtle without a bony shell. Rather, the carapace is covered by skin and flesh. It is also the largest of the various sea turtles, having an average carapace length of five feet…

ICS & LNG Worries: A Tempest in a Teapot

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on July 13, 2015

The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) recently voiced its concerns that the United States was potentially engaging in protectionist practices, especially where it concerns the future exports of liquefied natural gas (LNG). As the U.S.

HSK Kormoran

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 10, 2015

The merchant vessel Steiermark was launched in Kiel, Germany in 1938. It was 515 feet in length, displaced 8,700 tons, and was powered by four nine-cylinder diesel engines. It had just completed sea trials when war was declared and the ship…

Tall Ship Sørlandet

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 7, 2015

The tall ship Sørlandet was launched in 1927 in Kristiansand as a training vessel for Norwegian mariners. Displacing 499 tons, it has a length of 208 feet, a beam of 22.3 feet, and a draft of 14.6 feet. Its mainmast has a height above the waterline of 111 feet.

Intermodal Infrastructure: Hard Choices could yield Easy Fix

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on July 6, 2015

I don’t usually like to talk about highways. I despise traffic. Trucking – unless it involves 40’ TEU’s being lifted onto a post-Panamax boxship or perhaps a 53’ unit being driven smartly onto an LNG-powered ConRo ship – just isn’t my bag, either.

Launches 300 feet barge from barge carrier-another 300 feet barge

Posted to Eversafe Marine (by song Tom) on July 5, 2015

When talk about barge carrier people often think about LASH (Lighter Aboard SHip), SeaBees which equipped with the rail mounted gantry crane or a massive stern lift. Can a common barge carries a barge for transportation? And how to launch the…

USS United States

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 3, 2015

The Continental Navy was disestablished at the end of the American Revolution. In the early days of the Republic the only armed federal ships were operated by the Revenue Cutter Service. After American merchant ships operating in the Mediterranean came under attack by the Barbary pirates…

Foreign Aid Done Right:

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on June 30, 2015

Last week, the U.S. Trade and Development Agency (USTDA) awarded a grant to the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) to support the planning of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal. According to both ACP and USTDA, when the Panama Canal expansion project is completed next year…

USCGC Polar Star

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 30, 2015

The icebreaker USCGC Polar Star (WAGB-10) was commissioned in 1976, following construction by Lockheed Shipbuilding in Seattle. It is 399 feet long, with a beam of 83 feet, a draft of 31 feet, and a standard displacement of 10,863 long tons.

Samuel Cunard

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 26, 2015

Samuel Cunard (1787-1865) was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia. His parents were American Loyalists who moved to Canada at the end of the American Revolutionary War. His father was a master carpenter and timber merchant. Foregoing carpentry, young…

Opah

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 23, 2015

The opah or moonfish is a large pelagic fish with a colorful and deep body. It can grow up to six feet in length with a vertical measurement of over four feet, but a breadth or width of less than eighteen inches. It weighs up to 600 pounds.

A Tale of Two Academies

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on June 22, 2015

Less than two weeks ago, a vote by the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education (BHE) confirmed Francis X. McDonald as the 38th president of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy. That’s not especially earthshaking news, and outside our somewhat narrow “maritime” sphere, it garners even less attention.

Revenue Cutter Ingham

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 19, 2015

The US Revenue Cutter Ingham was launched in 1832 as part of the Morris-Taney class. The cutters were designed for multiple missions including, but not limited to, law enforcement, fighting pirates (which were particularly prevalent in the Gulf of Mexico and around Cuba), and augmenting the US Navy.

Bone-eating worms

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 16, 2015

First discovered on the deep seafloor of Monterey Bay in 2002, bone-eating worms (Osedax) seem to dine exclusively on the bones of whale carcasses that fall to the ocean floor (so-called whale falls). They are about one inch in length and composed entirely of soft tissue.

Royal Charter Storm

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 12, 2015

The super-storm of 25-28 October 1859 struck southeast England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and the Irish Sea with unexpected force, causing extensive damage at sea and ashore before moving on the Norway, albeit with diminished impact. It arose in the English Channel…