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Thursday, May 7, 2015

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Olavsvern

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 5, 2015

Norway near Tromsø. for the Royal Norwegian Navy. submarine pens, barracks, and industrial facilities. waste disposal were included. and other Arctic waters, which was considered vital during the Cold War. lessened. Olavsvern Naval Base was deactivated in 2002 and officially closed in 2009.

Bryde’s whale

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 1, 2015

that nation. the blue whale. tropical and temperate marine waters generally between 40°N and 40°S. last century. feet long, while females are about 45 feet. cousins. tons, also several tons less than the sei. surface and a white color on its ventral or lower surface. splashguard in front.

A License to Let Go

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on April 29, 2015

Almost 35 years ago, I earned my first seagoing credentials, an original Third Mate’s license, courtesy of four years spent at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy. Earlier this month, I finally came to the conclusion that maintaining that ticket…

Xenophyophore

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 28, 2015

Xenophyophore is a unicellular marine organism and cousin to the more familiar amoeba. It resides exclusively in very deep ocean waters (below 1,500 feet) and has been found in the Marianas Trench. Most single-cell organisms are so small as to not be visible to the naked eye.

Fish & Wildlife Service

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 24, 2015

U.S. to fish and wildlife conservation. predecessor agency, the Bureau of Fisheries, in 1871. operated three fishery survey vessels. 1885 in the Department of Agriculture. 1939, the two Bureaus were transferred to the Department of the Interior. agency and redesignated the Fish and Wildlife Service.

SS City of Flint

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 21, 2015

The steamship City of Flint was a Hog Island-class freighter built for the US Shipping Board by the American International Shipbuilding Corporation. Ordered in the waning days of World War I, it was not launched until 1919. It provided routine…

Unnecessarily Snarled in Traffic

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on April 17, 2015

Intermodal answers include the water.It was just last week that the (challenged) Keefe family packed up the SUV and set out for a little bit of spring break fun, mixed in with a college visit for my son, who will be a senior in high school next Fall.

Removal of oil from Zalinski wreck

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 17, 2015

The U.S. Army Transport Brigadier General M.G. Zalinski served as a general cargo ship for the War Department from 1941 until it sank on 26 September 1946 in the Grenville Channel of British Columbia’s Inside Passage. The 251-foot ship was built in 1919 in Lorain, Ohio as SS Lake Frohna.

Kerguelen Archipelago

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 14, 2015

A desolate group of islands, islets, and rocks in the southern Indian Ocean lie about 2,000 miles southeast of South Africa and about 1,000 miles north of Antarctica. The archipelago constitutes the highest portion of the largely submerged Kerguelen Plateau…

USS Columbine

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 10, 2015

USS Columbine was a side-wheel steamer that served briefly as a warship of the United States Navy during the Civil War. It was built in 1850 as a tugboat. It was purchased by the Navy in late 1862 to assist in Operation Anaconda, the naval blockade of the southern states.

Musashi

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 7, 2015

Musashi and her sistership Yamato were the most powerful battleships afloat. Designed in the late 1930s for the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN), they carried nine 18-inch main guns in three triple turrets. Expecting that the United States Navy would have superiority in the number of battleships…

Retourship Batavia

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 3, 2015

A retourship was a heavily armed and well-manned merchant ship of the Dutch East India Company (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnia or VOC), specifically designed for the long roundtrip (retour) voyage from the Netherlands to the East Indies. Numerous retourships were built and put into service…

CMA, WOW – and YOU

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on March 31, 2015

The ‘human element’ moves to the forefront at the Connecticut Maritime Association’s 30th annual event, and then, later, at the 7th annual Women on the Water gathering at Kings Point.I must admit that I struggled to come up with an overriding…

Battle of Puerto Plata

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 27, 2015

The Quasi-War with France (1798-1800) was the first military action of the new United States against a foreign nation. It was conducted almost entirely at sea, consisting mostly of engagements between the naval forces of the United States and the even newer French Republic.

A Book Review

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on March 24, 2015

Firefighting probably will never be a (hot) topic for discussion at the breakfast table, during leisure time or possibly any other venue. On the other hand, I can think of few things more important to a merchant mariner – or any seafarer, for that matter.

The 1929 Grand Banks earthquake

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 24, 2015

At about 5:02 pm on Monday, November 18, 1929, a 7.2 magnitude earthquake struck beneath the Laurentian Continental Slope about 250 miles south of the island of Newfoundland. The water there is about 7,000 feet deep. The earthquake was felt as far away as New York, Bermuda, and Montreal.

Gull v Tern

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 20, 2015

The gull is a sea bird of the family Laridae. Its cousin the tern is a sea bird of the family Sternidae. More distant relatives include auks, skimmers, and waders. Gulls are larger than terns. Feather coloration of the two species is similar – generally white or gray…

Christian Radich

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 17, 2015

Christian Radich is a full-rigged ship, meaning that it has (at least) three masts and all of the masts are rigged for square (actuality rectangular) sails. It was built in Sandefjord, Norway in 1937 as a sail training vessel for the Norwegian merchant marine.

Internal waves

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 13, 2015

Internal waves, also known as solitary waves or solitons, are gravity waves that oscillate within a medium, such as water or air, rather than at the interface between two mediums. A common example would be a bottle of olive oil and vinegar.

Crown-of-thorns starfish

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 10, 2015

The crown-of-thorns starfish is named for the venomous spines or thorns that cover its upper surface. The spines, as well as other portions of the body, contain powerful toxins. The spines are both sharp and brittle. They penetrate soft material…