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Tuesday, March 31, 2015

CMA, WOW – and YOU

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on March 31, 2015

The ‘human element’ moves to the forefront at the Connecticut Maritime Association’s 30th annual event, and then, later, at the 7 annual Women on the Water gathering at Kings Point.I must admit that I struggled to come with an overriding theme…

Battle of Puerto Plata

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 27, 2015

The Quasi-War with France (1798-1800) was the first military action of the new United States against a foreign nation. It was conducted almost entirely at sea, consisting mostly of engagements between the naval forces of the United States and the even newer French Republic.

A Book Review

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on March 24, 2015

Firefighting probably will never be a (hot) topic for discussion at the breakfast table, during leisure time or possibly any other venue. On the other hand, I can think of few things more important to a merchant mariner – or any seafarer, for that matter.

The 1929 Grand Banks earthquake

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 24, 2015

At about 5:02 pm on Monday, November 18, 1929, a 7.2 magnitude earthquake struck beneath the Laurentian Continental Slope about 250 miles south of the island of Newfoundland. The water there is about 7,000 feet deep. The earthquake was felt as far away as New York, Bermuda, and Montreal.

Gull v Tern

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 20, 2015

The gull is a sea bird of the family Laridae. Its cousin the tern is a sea bird of the family Sternidae. More distant relatives include auks, skimmers, and waders. Gulls are larger than terns. Feather coloration of the two species is similar – generally white or gray…

Christian Radich

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 17, 2015

Christian Radich is a full-rigged ship, meaning that it has (at least) three masts and all of the masts are rigged for square (actuality rectangular) sails. It was built in Sandefjord, Norway in 1937 as a sail training vessel for the Norwegian merchant marine.

Internal waves

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 13, 2015

Internal waves, also known as solitary waves or solitons, are gravity waves that oscillate within a medium, such as water or air, rather than at the interface between two mediums. A common example would be a bottle of olive oil and vinegar.

Crown-of-thorns starfish

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 10, 2015

The crown-of-thorns starfish is named for the venomous spines or thorns that cover its upper surface. The spines, as well as other portions of the body, contain powerful toxins. The spines are both sharp and brittle. They penetrate soft material…

Dialing for Dollars, Reaching for Relevance

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on March 6, 2015

It was just last week that U.S. Maritime Administrator Paul Jaenichen made the annual trudge to the Hill to present his case for an operating budget in the coming fiscal year. At the same time, it is important to note that the President's Fiscal…

Ternate

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 6, 2015

Ternate is a relatively small (43 square mile) island in the Molucca Islands of Indonesia. For hundreds of years, it was the center of the Sultanate of Ternate, one of the wealthiest and most powerful governments in the region, exercising influence as far as Sulawesi and Papua.

Ark Royal

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 3, 2015

The galleon eventually known as Ark Royal was ordered by Sir Walter Raleigh in 1586 as the Ark. Under the prevailing convention of the time, it was referred to by the owner’s name – thus Ark Raleigh. It was built by R. Chapman of Deptford with two gun decks…

Lake Nicaragua shark

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 27, 2015

The Lake Nicaragua shark is a common bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas) that has adapted to living, at least temporarily, in the fresh water of Lake Nicaragua and the San Juan River, which connects the lake to the Caribbean Sea. Similar adaptive…

River sharks

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 24, 2015

River sharks (Glyphis) are five rare species found only in rivers and estuaries of South Asia and Austronesia. They are related to the larger bull sharks, which are sometimes found in the same waters, but unlike bull sharks, they do not migrate into marine waters.

Autonomous spaceport drone ship

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 20, 2015

The deck barge Marmac 300 (CG No. 1063184) was built in 1998 by Gulf Coast Fabrication in Pearlington, Mississippi for McDonough Marine Service, a tug and barge company based in Metairie, Louisiana. As built, it was 288 feet in length, with a 100 foot beam and a depth of almost 20 feet.

Getting on Board the Regulatory Train

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on February 19, 2015

This week finds the collective domestic oil industry wringing its hands about the latest in a series of serious oil transport train casualties. This time, on Monday, the news involved a crude-carrying train that derailed in West Virginia, complete…

Ephemeris

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 17, 2015

An ephemeris is a calendar giving the positions of naturally-occurring astronomical objects and, these days, artificial satellites in the sky at given times. Originally, the ephemerides were developed by and for astronomers at particular observatories.

Sea lily

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 13, 2015

The sea lily (Bourgueticrinida) is an order of marine animals referred to as crinoids. They are typically found in deep ocean waters (to a depth of about 18,000 feet). In their adult form, they are attached to the sea floor by means of a stalk.

Le Griffon

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 10, 2015

The French explored and settled in the Saint Lawrence River valley (which they referred to as New France) during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. They sailed their ships as far inland as Lake Ontario, but were stymied by the Niagara Falls.

Bonin Islands

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 6, 2015

The Bonin Islands, also known as the Ogasawara Islands, are an archipelago of 30 tropical and subtropical islands in the western Pacific about 550 nautical miles almost due south of Tokyo. They are the most isolated of the inhabited Japanese islands.

Zeroing in on Zukunft:

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on February 3, 2015

Long Beach, CA: Less than 12 hours after the New England Patriots’ late game heroics stunned the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XLIX, U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Paul Zukunft found himself facing a standing room only audience of Passenger Vessel Association (PVA) delegates…
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