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Monday, March 2, 2015

Ark Royala

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Joseph Fonseca)

Flagship of the nascent Navy Royal  The galleon eventually known as Ark Royal was ordered by Sir Walter Raleigh in 1586 as the Ark. Under the prevailing convention of the time, it was referred to by the owner’s name – thus Ark Raleigh. It was built by R. Chapman of Deptford with two gun decks…

Lake Nicaragua shark

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Joseph Fonseca)

 The Lake Nicaragua shark is a common bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas) that has adapted to living, at least temporarily, in the fresh water of Lake Nicaragua and the San Juan River, which connects the lake to the Caribbean Sea.  Similar adaptive bull sharks have also been…

River sharks

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Joseph Fonseca)

 River sharks (Glyphis) are five rare species found only in rivers and estuaries of South Asia and Austronesia.  They are related to the larger bull sharks, which are sometimes found in the same waters, but unlike bull sharks, they do not migrate into marine waters. …

Autonomous spaceport drone ship

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Joseph Fonseca)

The barge used by SpaceX for landing its first-stage rocket after launch  The deck barge Marmac 300 (CG No. 1063184) was built in 1998 by Gulf Coast Fabrication in Pearlington, Mississippi for McDonough Marine Service, a tug and barge company based in Metairie, Louisiana. …

Having Trouble Explaining the Difference Between Near Misses and Unsafe Acts?

Posted to Madden Maritime (by Joseph Keefe)

 Is it a near miss?  Or was it an unsafe act?  Maybe just an unsafe condition.  What’s the difference and how do you explain it to your crew when introducing them to your safety management system? Check out nearmiss.dk for more cartoons like the one below.

Ephemeris

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Joseph Fonseca)

 An ephemeris is a calendar giving the positions of naturally-occurring astronomical objects and, these days, artificial satellites in the sky at given times.  Originally, the ephemerides were developed by and for astronomers at particular observatories.  The oldest…

Sea lily

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Joseph Fonseca)

The sea lily (Bourgueticrinida) is an order of marine animals referred to as crinoids.  They are typically found in deep ocean waters (to a depth of about 18,000 feet).  In their adult form, they are attached to the sea floor by means of a stalk.  The main body is referred…

Le Griffon

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Joseph Fonseca)

First major European vessel on the upper Great Lakes  The French explored and settled in the Saint Lawrence River valley (which they referred to as New France) during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.  They sailed their ships as far inland as Lake Ontario, but were…

Bonin Islands

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Joseph Fonseca)

 The Bonin Islands, also known as the Ogasawara Islands, are an archipelago of 30 tropical and subtropical islands in the western Pacific about 550 nautical miles almost due south of Tokyo.  They are the most isolated of the inhabited Japanese islands.  The islands…

Green crab

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Joseph Fonseca)

 The green crab (Carcinus maenas) is a crab common to littoral marine waters of the northeast Atlantic coast and the Baltic Sea.  A related species (Carcinus aestuarii) can be found in the Mediterranean Sea.  The adult carapace of the green crab is about 3.5 inches wide. …

Battle of the Saintes

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Joseph Fonseca)

 After the French fleet under Admiral Comte de Grasse deterred the Royal Navy from relieving General Cornwallis at Yorktown in 1781, it sailed to the Caribbean to put continued pressure on British interests in the Americas.  The sugar plantations in Jamaica brought more…

Robert McClure

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Joseph Fonseca)

 Robert John Le Mesurier McClure (1807-1873) joined the Royal Navy in 1824.  He served as mate on the HMS Terror (a converted bomb ship) in the unsuccessful Frozen Strait Expedition of 1836-37.  Afterwards, he served in the Canadian lakes and in various North American…

Battle of Actium

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Joseph Fonseca)

 After the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C., the Roman Republic was led by the Second Triumvirate, which consisted of Octavian (the adopted son of Julius Caesar), Mark Antony (the magister equitum of Caesar’s army), and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus (a political ally…

Vaquita porpoise

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Joseph Fonseca)

World’s most endangered cetacean  The vaquita porpoise is small by cetacean standards, averaging just over four feet in length.  Identified as a separate species only in 1958, it is found exclusively at the northern end of the Gulf of California.  The name is…

SS City of Rio de Janeiro

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Joseph Fonseca)

Its 1901 sinking was one of San Francisco’s worst maritime disasters  The steamship City of Rio de Janeiro, which sported a barquentine rig, was built in Chester, Pennsylvania in 1878 to serve the United States & Brazil Mail Steamship Company carrying mail, cargo,…

Cargo Moment : Twin 20' Lift Gone Bad

Posted to Madden Maritime (by Joseph Keefe)

The introduction of the standardized cargo freight container changed the shipping industry forever. From literally weeks to discharge and load a ship, cargo operations are now measured in hours. Moving tens of tons of cargo at a time is not without its hazards and drawbacks, however.

Clipper Ship RAINBOW

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Joseph Fonseca)

The first extreme clipper  Clipper ships, as a recognized type of vessel, originated with small, fast ships operating out of Baltimore during the War of 1812.  Their sharp lines and deeper than usual keels allowed them to sail closer to the wind.  They were able to…

HMS Terror

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Joseph Fonseca)

 HMS Terror was a bomb ship constructed by the Royal Navy in 1813.  Intended specifically for carrying and firing large mortars (the shells were 10 and 13 inches in diameter), the hull was heavily reinforced.  It first saw action in the bombardment of Stonington, Connecticut…

Risk Moment : Shipyards and the Perfect Storm of Risk

Posted to Madden Maritime (by Joseph Keefe)

Shipyards are a time for getting the maintenance done – and frequently, it is maintenance that can’t be done under normal operating conditions or that which requires specialized skills/equipment. This month, The Swedish Club looks at a shipyard evolution in their Monthly Safety Scenario.

New Siberian Islands

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Joseph Fonseca)

 The archipelago called the New Siberian Islands is not new, having existed for eons and containing fossils from the Late Pleistocene (over 100,000 years ago) and probably earlier.  Bedrock on the islands is significantly older.  The archipelago is comprised of three…
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