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Sunday, May 24, 2015

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Dumbo octopus

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 22, 2015

(below 9,000 feet). umbrella shape, with protrusions at each ‘rib’. The arms of some species have spines in addition to suckers. blue, to purple. feet. Grimpoteuthis, almost everyone refers to it as the Dumbo octopus. mantle, just above the lateral eyes. fins are used for propulsion. Disney movie.

The Whole Picture: OMG! What Do We Do With All This Data?

Posted to The Whole Picture: OMG! What Do We Do With All This Data? (by Melvin Mathews) on May 21, 2015

The industry-wide trend of digitalisation means many companies now find themselves overwhelmed with large amounts of data. When the data begins streaming in, there naturally arises the question as to what is to be done with all this data.Data naturally brings with it new set of issues to tackle…

Chemosymbiotic marine animals

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 19, 2015

discovery of geothermal vents in deep ocean waters in 1977. nutrients. the deep ocean, so photosynthesis is off the table. sulfur compounds, and methane compounds. vents. and methane compounds. provide at least a part of their energy needs. Mollusks are the most common of these hybrids. in the gut.

RV Marion Dufresne II

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 15, 2015

and supply vessel in the Southern Ocean. there. work has also taken it to the Pacific and the Atlantic Oceans. on behalf of the French Polar Institute Paul-Emile Victor. vessels. a helicopter deck. paleoclimatic data from throughout the world’s oceans. six officers and 22 sailors. laboratories.

Easily Eliminating Electronic Errors

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on May 13, 2015

It’s been quite a few years since my wife spent time on the road with a major financial consulting group. The Monday morning through Thursday afternoon routine can be a tough one, but she did it and handled it as well as anyone could, for an extended period.

Smooth toadfish

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 12, 2015

as well as Kangaroo Island and Tasmania. areas. length, with an elongate body, a rounded back, and a flattened white belly. It has a small mouth with fused teeth. surface, they do not protrude from the skin, unlike in its cousins. with irregular brown spots and several dark brown bands.

Raphael Semmes

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 8, 2015

an army general. lieutenant in 1837. Veracruz. to meet up with the army. from the US Navy. officers served as Lighthouse Inspectors. the US Navy and joined the new Confederate Navy as a commander. the steamer Habana into the commerce raider CSS Sumter.

Olavsvern

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 5, 2015

Norway near Tromsø. for the Royal Norwegian Navy. submarine pens, barracks, and industrial facilities. waste disposal were included. and other Arctic waters, which was considered vital during the Cold War. lessened. Olavsvern Naval Base was deactivated in 2002 and officially closed in 2009.

Bryde’s whale

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 1, 2015

that nation. the blue whale. tropical and temperate marine waters generally between 40°N and 40°S. last century. feet long, while females are about 45 feet. cousins. tons, also several tons less than the sei. surface and a white color on its ventral or lower surface. splashguard in front.

A License to Let Go

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on April 29, 2015

Almost 35 years ago, I earned my first seagoing credentials, an original Third Mate’s license, courtesy of four years spent at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy. Earlier this month, I finally came to the conclusion that maintaining that ticket…

Xenophyophore

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 28, 2015

Xenophyophore is a unicellular marine organism and cousin to the more familiar amoeba. It resides exclusively in very deep ocean waters (below 1,500 feet) and has been found in the Marianas Trench. Most single-cell organisms are so small as to not be visible to the naked eye.

Fish & Wildlife Service

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 24, 2015

U.S. to fish and wildlife conservation. predecessor agency, the Bureau of Fisheries, in 1871. operated three fishery survey vessels. 1885 in the Department of Agriculture. 1939, the two Bureaus were transferred to the Department of the Interior. agency and redesignated the Fish and Wildlife Service.

SS City of Flint

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 21, 2015

The steamship City of Flint was a Hog Island-class freighter built for the US Shipping Board by the American International Shipbuilding Corporation. Ordered in the waning days of World War I, it was not launched until 1919. It provided routine…

Unnecessarily Snarled in Traffic

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on April 17, 2015

Intermodal answers include the water.It was just last week that the (challenged) Keefe family packed up the SUV and set out for a little bit of spring break fun, mixed in with a college visit for my son, who will be a senior in high school next Fall.

Removal of oil from Zalinski wreck

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 17, 2015

The U.S. Army Transport Brigadier General M.G. Zalinski served as a general cargo ship for the War Department from 1941 until it sank on 26 September 1946 in the Grenville Channel of British Columbia’s Inside Passage. The 251-foot ship was built in 1919 in Lorain, Ohio as SS Lake Frohna.

Kerguelen Archipelago

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 14, 2015

A desolate group of islands, islets, and rocks in the southern Indian Ocean lie about 2,000 miles southeast of South Africa and about 1,000 miles north of Antarctica. The archipelago constitutes the highest portion of the largely submerged Kerguelen Plateau…

USS Columbine

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 10, 2015

USS Columbine was a side-wheel steamer that served briefly as a warship of the United States Navy during the Civil War. It was built in 1850 as a tugboat. It was purchased by the Navy in late 1862 to assist in Operation Anaconda, the naval blockade of the southern states.

Musashi

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 7, 2015

Musashi and her sistership Yamato were the most powerful battleships afloat. Designed in the late 1930s for the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN), they carried nine 18-inch main guns in three triple turrets. Expecting that the United States Navy would have superiority in the number of battleships…

Retourship Batavia

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 3, 2015

A retourship was a heavily armed and well-manned merchant ship of the Dutch East India Company (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnia or VOC), specifically designed for the long roundtrip (retour) voyage from the Netherlands to the East Indies. Numerous retourships were built and put into service…

CMA, WOW – and YOU

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on March 31, 2015

The ‘human element’ moves to the forefront at the Connecticut Maritime Association’s 30th annual event, and then, later, at the 7th annual Women on the Water gathering at Kings Point.I must admit that I struggled to come up with an overriding…