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Sunday, August 30, 2015

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Henry Every

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 28, 2015

from the business and enjoy his ill-gotten gains. famous for providing England with a large percentage of its seafarers. dishonorable. and mutinied. and Every was elected captain. plundering ships off West Africa, they moved into the Indian Ocean. and joined up with a number of other pirates.

The Maritime Person of the Year

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on August 27, 2015

The Massachusetts Maritime Academy’s annual salute to ‘the person of the year’ this year spotlights McAllister Towing and Transportation Co. and its leadership team.Set for September 10, 2015, MMA’s Salute to the Maritime Person of the Year…

Enewetak Atoll

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 25, 2015

Marshall Islands. 40 small islands grouped around a large and deep lagoon. two square miles, with a mean elevation of ten feet above sea level. individuals. the atoll submerged slowly millions of years ago. its edges. the basis for the atoll. been inhabited for about 3,000 years.

Thomas Tew

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 25, 2015

pirate voyage. birth are unknown, but he was certainly British. 1680’s and may have been married and may have had two daughters. marque, allowing him to attack French and Spanish merchant vessels. at the mouth of the Gambia River. turn to piracy. Town and Madagascar. the Ottoman Empire.

Bartholomew Roberts

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 21, 2015

captured. (birthname John Roberts), he were to sea at an early age. stead throughout his life. trade. ship was captured by pirates. rewards. could not understand. ransom. ruse and killed the pirate captain when he came ashore. captain. population, and stole almost all items of value.

Keeping Up With the Jones (Act)

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on August 19, 2015

Puerto Rico’s money woes have nothing to do with the Jones Act. Arguably, the U.S. island would be worse off without it.In the late 1980’s, I was toiling for a small maritime consulting group, traveling probably 20 days per month, following…

Edward Low

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 18, 2015

Edward Low (ca. 1690 – ca. the cruelest pirate, which says a lot. deter resistance. a certain extent. boardings. had resisted. them afire, watching as the flesh burned down to the bone. Low in 1722 was able to escape the next year. pirate. died of their injuries.

William Dampier

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 14, 2015

nearly 64 years. Royal Navy in 1673, a service cut short by illness. Spanish Main and the coast of Peru. and eventually back to England, arriving in 1691. animals and plants. as “A New Voyage Round the World”. vessels. as Terra Australis). and a crew of 50.

Anne Bonny

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 11, 2015

Anne Bonny (1700? about 1700. to Charles Town in the Province of South Carolina. Mary died soon after their arrival. became a merchant and was soon wealthy. (or Annie) grew up to be quite independent and oftentimes defiant. with a sailor and petty criminal named James Bonny.

Samuel Bellamy

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 7, 2015

pirate. period for young men seeking adventure. where he courted the young Maria Hallett. earlier. Maria was pregnant. wedlock. arrival. ship Mary Anne, commanded by Benjamin Hornigold. Hornigold out and elected Bellamy as the new pirate captain. their valuables. and merciful with those he captured.

Jean Bart

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 4, 2015

1650. several miles from the border with Belgium. frequently. to the English in 1658. King Louis XIV purchased Dunkerque from King Charles II for £320,000. been the subject of three kingdoms. the famous Admiral De Ruyter. Dunkerque to fight his previous comrades.

Meaningful Cadet Training Means Funding Modern Ships

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on August 3, 2015

State Maritime Academies scramble to replace aging training platforms.As the state maritime academies collectively plead for “new, modern training platforms for the mariners who guide the critical cargoes to our ports and to our servicemen and women overseas…

USS Olympia

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 31, 2015

shortages involving its guns and armor plating. the US Asiatic Fleet. designed to correct the deficiencies of a weakened and neglected naval force. rise of the steel shipbuilding industry of the United States. the ship’s twin screws, giving the ship a maximum speed of 21.7 knots.

Shrimp

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 28, 2015

their aquatic habitat by means of swimming. fresh water. small lobsters without claws (there are exceptions). pleopods which are well adapted for swimming. than the body. relatively wide. movement. feeders. of the marine type found in large groups over the continental shelf.

Go East, Young Man, Go East

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on July 24, 2015

A recent report from Zepol, a Minnesota-based company that provides U.S. import and export data, implies that importers are beginning to move their business from the U.S. West Coast to East Coast ports. In fact, they characterize the trend as…

Tidal bore

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 24, 2015

series of waves propagating upstream as the tidal flow turns to rising. bay. flow conditions and the river channel bathymetry. changes in boundary conditions and freshwater inflow. spring tidal ranges and low freshwater flow conditions. wavefront followed by a train of secondary waves.

Basking shark

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 21, 2015

name from its slow speed (about two knots) and its method of feeding. exclusively on plankton and other small plant and animal matter. width and almost three feet vertically). gills. lower jaw. over the gills, it goes through the gill rakers. hooks that trap the food and divert it to the esophagus.

SS City of Cairo

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 17, 2015

convoy vessel. Asian ports, with frequent stops in South Africa. traditional route. important voyage, but ended up being its last. coins. Treasury and were intended for the financial support of the war effort. of Durban, Cape Town, and Pernambuco (now Recife), Brazil.

Leatherback sea turtle

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 14, 2015

The leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) is, as its name implies, the only sea turtle without a bony shell. Rather, the carapace is covered by skin and flesh. It is also the largest of the various sea turtles, having an average carapace length of five feet…

ICS & LNG Worries: A Tempest in a Teapot

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on July 13, 2015

The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) recently voiced its concerns that the United States was potentially engaging in protectionist practices, especially where it concerns the future exports of liquefied natural gas (LNG). As the U.S.